What are Reviews?

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Thursday teaser from Book Review Secrets for Author Success

By Barb Drozdowich

A book review can run the spectrum of a few words to several pages of critique.

Perhaps this is why it is so difficult to characterize and perhaps this is why many readers are so intimidated at the thought of leaving a review for a book they have read—they imagine it to be a much bigger deal than it actually is.

Or…perhaps readers are having flashbacks to high school English class and don’t want to go there…

Regardless, we as authors need to not only get better at characterizing what a review is (so we can help our readers understand what we want them to do), but also recognize the need or use of various different types of reviews.

Let’s start with what a review is, throw in some rules and then move on from there.

In its simplest form, a review can be “Great Book!” or “Loved this book.” These words can be accompanied by some stars or other type of rating. As I said, on the other end of the spectrum, a review can be pages of critique on various aspects of the book. These brief, or extensive thoughts, can be sent to you by email, they can be posted on a private blog or website, a commercial blog or website, a social media site or a retail site.

With respect to these reviews, certain commercial platforms like Amazon have rules that reviewers have to follow regarding content and most commercial review-granting organizations have guidelines or expectations posted. 

But for the most part, there are no rules. This isn’t high school English class and the teacher hasn’t just handed out a paper for an assignment.

However, a review can still be: “Great book!”

Perhaps this is the crux of the problem. How are we to help our readers understand what we want them to do unless we can be a bit more concrete?

Let’s divide reviews into professional reviews or commercial reviews and reader reviews, as I’m sure you can agree the standards can be expected to be different.

A reader review is the chance for a reader to share their thoughts about what they thought of a book. Keep in mind, this is something that readers have always done—even before the creation of Amazon—we would chat with fellow book lovers. In my mind, there is nothing better than chatting about the latest book I’ve read. I know that urge to shout to the world about a really good book was one of the driving forces behind my book blog creation.

Since the advent of the internet, reader reviews, which were once an in-person activity, have also moved to online. Not only can readers leave reviews on their (or other’s) blogs or websites, but readers are encouraged to leave reviews of books purchased from any of the book retail sites—and will likely get a reminder email from the retailer to do so. In addition, there are various social media sites like Goodreads which encourage readers to list and review books.

Several years ago I was at a conference and a presenter on the subject of reviews said that “reviews” which occur before a book is published are reviews for the author; “reviews” that occur after the book is published are for readers. I initially tried to push back on that thought, but the more I mulled it over, the more I realized how correct it was. As authors we generally see pre-publication reviews as critiques, but they are generally devices to help us improve—to polish our book before it is published. Once published, the book is available for purchase by readers; any one of those readers has the ability to share their thoughts.

We don’t qualify who can and can’t purchase our books. They are available for sale to anyone who has enough money to pay for them. In a similar vein, we can’t control the reviews that are shared about our books. It is true that some people go out of their way to be unkind in their thoughts when reviewing, but in my experience the majority of reader reviews are honest and forthright. In many cases, reader reviews can be quite helpful to us as authors. 

A short story before we move on from this topic. One of the first books I published was on the topic of Goodreads, a reader-centric social website. I was determined to explain to authors how to navigate this rabbit’s warren of a site and take advantage of its powerful features. To help with the navigation of the site, I carefully created 250 color screenshots and other graphics to include in my book in order to help with my step-by-step instructions of “click on the blue button,” etc. I tested the e-book on my 27-inch computer and it looked beautiful! One of the very first reviews I received was very critical and complained that the graphics were too small to be seen on a smart phone screen. My first thought was “why the hell are you reading this book on your phone?” Of course the graphics are small on a tiny phone screen. Trying to be helpful, I replied to the review and suggested the reviewer view the book on a larger screen, perhaps a desktop computer. I was told the only electronic device she owned was a smart phone—she did everything from her phone.

Although I didn’t like this review, it was justified and I learned from it. The next edition of the Goodreads book had links to a video course and the screenshots and other graphics were gone. 

I am the type of person who reads most reviews—especially at the beginning. I find I learn from them. That being said, if you are the type of personality that is easily thrown off by comments from readers, don’t read them.

Let’s move on to professional or commercial reviews—or perhaps we should call these “non-reader” reviews. 

This is a big category and what fits in here can be open to interpretation. To add come clarity, let me define what I mean by “professional or commercial” reviews.

A professional or commercial review, whether it is something the author seeks out or not, is a review that is written by an experienced person generally following a stated set of guidelines.

As I mentioned, the reviewer is typically experienced, and may have an educational or experiential background in reviewing books. An example of this would be a book reviewer for a major newspaper or literary publication. The reviewer may be a person who is well versed in the genre of the book, or an expert in the field if the book is non-fiction. An example of this is a peer review in an industry publication for a non-fiction book.

Focusing on a commercial review—or a review that an author pays for—these reviews, generally speaking, are carried out by an experienced reviewer and follow a stated set of guidelines. Or in other words, if you purchase a review, you should be aware of what may or may not be said and what may or may not be shared publicly. We’ll go into details in a future chapter, but authors should have access to an FAQ of sorts about what they are paying for and if the review is not favorable, they may have the option of preventing the review from being made public.

As I said at the beginning of this chapter, although a review can run the gamut of a few words to several pages of critique, when talking about a professional or commercial review, they are unlikely to be only several words and are much more likely to be at least several paragraphs in length or longer. 

Are you any closer to understanding what a review is? Can you describe a review to your readers when you ask them to share some thoughts? Ultimately, it is part of our job as authors to ask our readers to leave a review. Before moving on to the next chapter, perhaps take a few moments and jot down a blurb asking for a review that you can put in the back matter of your next book!

Book Review Secrets for Author Success

Feel like it’s impossible to get more reviews for your book? Discover a comprehensive guide to every single review gathering method in publishing.

No idea where to start to get reviews for your book? Worried about hiring a professional service or contacting blogs to get those five-star marks? Award-winning author and professional reviewer Barb Drozdowich knows reviews inside and out. As the owner of the world’s largest reviewer database, let her break down the complex and confusing world of author testimonials to help you get the feedback you need to make your book a success.

Book Reviews for Author Success is a step-by-step handbook that describes all possible methods for getting more reviews for your work. From contacting literary and commercial services to bloggers and readers, Drozdowich’s conversational style demystifies the jargon in her laundry list of strategies. Intended to educate authors of all levels, the book leaves no stone unturned in the quest for your first or thousandth review.

In Book Reviews for Author Success , you’ll discover:

  • The rules and guidelines authors must use to earn professional reviews
  • A list of every type of review and how to start getting them
  • The power of social proof and why authors must seek testimonials
  • Practical exercises to help you better understand review gathering
  • A full glossary, pages and pages of extensive resources, and much, much more!

Book Reviews for Author Success is a packed, professional reference for any author looking to generate reviews. If you like easy-to-follow systems, complex subjects taught in plain English, and expert advice from key players, then you’ll love Barb Drozdowich’s superb manual.

Find it on Amazon.

About Barb Drozdowich

Social Media and WordPress Consultant Barb Drozdowich has taught in colleges, universities and in the banking industry. Now she brings her 15+ years of teaching experience and a deep love of books to help authors develop the social media platform needed to succeed in today’s fast evolving publishing world. She delights in taking technical subjects and making them understandable by the average person. She owns Bakerview Consulting and manages the popular blog, Sugarbeat’s Books, where she talks about romance novels.

She is the author of 15 books, over 40 YouTube videos an online Goodreads course and an online WordPress course, all focused on helping authors and bloggers. Barb lives in the mountains of British Columbia with her family.

Visit her Bestselling Reads author page, her Amazon Author page, or on social media:

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Thursday teaser: Book Review Secrets for Author Success

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Read on to find out how you can win a free e-copy of this book, this week’s non-fiction teaser

By Barb Drozdowich

In today’s internet savvy world, reviews are ubiquitous. They serve as social proof.

I’m sure you’ve noticed in the last few years, we are encouraged to share our thoughts about retail purchases, vacations or hotel stays, and even doctor or dentist visits. Even if you, like me, feel this level of social sharing to be a bit over the top, this is the world that we live in. Not only that, this is the world that our books are published in.

As such, we need to find success in this world—which means paying attention to not only the importance of reviews, but also how to actively request them.

If we go beyond the idea that reviews serve as social proof for other buyers, other potential readers of our books, what are other reasons for accruing them?

1. They establish credibility.

2. They are a form of publicity.

3. They help to introduce a book to a wider audience.

4. They can play a role in the buying process on retail sites.

5. They are an effective tool in book marketing—sharing quotes, links to reviews, etc.

6. They can be used for blurbs on your book cover.

7. One review begets another.

8. They help a book qualify for other promotional opportunities.

9. They help people learn about your book from people other than you.

10. People are sheep and will follow a crowd—if others rave about a book, readers will take their advice.

Let’s see if I can flesh out some of the reasons listed above.

The first reason listed above is the fact that the presence of reviews gives your book a sense of credibility. These days, a book on Amazon or other online retailer without any reviews seems out of place. There is an expectation of reviews being present. This presence of reviews can be a strong stimulus in the buying process

On Amazon, any reviews are shown in ads that appear on the book’s detail page. Displayed without any words, those stars give readers a summary of other reader’s thoughts. If we move away from retail sites, blogger reviews can be shared with thousands of viewers of their blog—a great way of spreading buzz about a book.

As mentioned above, a review shared on an established book blog is a great way to spread buzz about a book. Perhaps introduce a book to a new audience. Book bloggers create posts that are easily searched and indexed by Google. Anyone searching Google and finding a blog post can be a potential new reader for a book.

It is very common for authors to either use excerpts from blurbs on the front or back cover of their book. Quotes can also be used in social media posts, advertisement copy, and other forms of publicity. 

It is fairly well known that one review begets another. Whether readers agree or disagree with posted reviews, they often feel compelled to share their own thoughts. This is seen in terms of comments on blogs or reviews or comments on retail sites.

Many promotional sites require a minimum number of reviews—and usually this refers to Amazon reviews—in order to qualify for promotional packages. Many promotional companies don’t independently vet submissions; they use Amazon reviews for that purpose. By that I mean, they generally set a minimum number of reviews with a minimum star number as the entry point.

The 10th point from above is about people being sheep. Perhaps there is a kinder way to phrase this, but I’m sure everyone who reads this book has picked up a book to prove it is really THAT bad or really THAT good. Or at least has a friend who’s done it. If we go back to the introduction of this book, I commented on the fact that book “reviews” are not new things. Readers have been sharing their thoughts on a book just finished for many, many years. Readers just love to share their thoughts about a much beloved book. I’m sure you’ve had a fellow reader say to you: “You must read…” with great enthusiasm in their voice!

One last comment about reviews before we move on to learn about the current review etiquette:

**Reviews don’t necessarily equal sales**

Although I strongly believe that reviews have to be present in order to sell a book there isn’t a direct equivalency. In other words, one review doesn’t equal one sale. More reviews don’t equal more sales. Because of this, authors struggle to understand how many reviews they really need. There is a myth circulating that certain high-end book promotion sites require a minimum of 50 reviews to qualify. This isn’t true. Generally speaking authors should aim for 10 to 20 reader reviews on Amazon at a minimum. This will give a book some credibility and a variety of thoughts for potential buyers to read through. This will also provide a base of reviews to qualify for most book promotion sites. Lastly, book reviews—or what type of book reviews an author seeks out—should be part of a bigger picture plan and part of well-thought-out goals.

In future chapters we will talk about various types of reviews. We’ll discuss the pros and cons and the realities and hopefully cut through the myths and provide some clarity.

Before we can talk about the various types of reviews, we need to talk about review etiquette— the current dos and don’ts of the review world.

Book Review Secrets for Author Success

Feel like it’s impossible to get more reviews for your book? Discover a comprehensive guide to every single review gathering method in publishing.

No idea where to start to get reviews for your book? Worried about hiring a professional service or contacting blogs to get those five-star marks? Award-winning author and professional reviewer Barb Drozdowich knows reviews inside and out. As the owner of the world’s largest reviewer database, let her break down the complex and confusing world of author testimonials to help you get the feedback you need to make your book a success.

Book Reviews for Author Success is a step-by-step handbook that describes all possible methods for getting more reviews for your work. From contacting literary and commercial services to bloggers and readers, Drozdowich’s conversational style demystifies the jargon in her laundry list of strategies. Intended to educate authors of all levels, the book leaves no stone unturned in the quest for your first or thousandth review.

In Book Reviews for Author Success, you’ll discover:

  • the rules and guidelines authors must use to earn professional reviews
  • a list of every type of review and how to start getting them
  • the power of social proof and why authors must seek testimonials
  • practical exercises to help you better understand review gathering
  • a full glossary, pages and pages of extensive resources, and much, much more!

Book Review Secrets for Author Success is a packed, professional reference for any author looking to generate reviews. If you like easy-to-follow systems, complex subjects taught in plain English, and expert advice from key players, then you’ll love Barb Drozdowich’s superb manual.

Get Book Reviews for Author Success from your choice of e-tailer.

About the author

Social Media and WordPress Consultant Barb Drozdowich has taught in colleges, universities and in the banking industry. More recently, she brings her 15+ years of teaching experience and a deep love of books to help authors develop the social media platform needed to succeed in today’s fast evolving publishing world. She delights in taking technical subjects and making them understandable by the average person. She owns Bakerview Consulting and manages the popular blog, Sugarbeat’s Books, where she talks about Romance novels.

She is the author of 15 books, over 40 YouTube videos an online Goodreads course and an online WordPress course, all focused on helping authors and bloggers. Barb lives in the mountains of British Columbia with her family.

Find out more about Barb on her BestSelling Reads author page, Amazon author page or her website.

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Thursday teaser: How to Self-Publish a Book

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How to self-publish a bookBy Barb Drozdowich

Self-publishing—or Indie publishing, as it is also known—is the publishing equalizer. Gate-keepers are removed and authors can publish a book they feel has merit. Along with the removal of many of the gate-keepers, in recent years much of the stigma has also been removed. Authors who choose to publish their own work are capable of having a respectable and successful career as published authors.

So…you are interested in learning about self-publishing. Do you use the term “Self-Publishing” or “Indie-Publishing” or “Independent Publishing”? In my mind all these phrases mean the same thing.  They all refer to the act of publishing a book where you are the driver of the operation—you may ask for, and receive, help, but you make all the decisions.

I am the proud author of 15 self-published books, have sold thousands of copies and I am frequently answering questions about or dispelling myths about self-publishing. As a result, I decided to put fingers to keyboard and explain the process of self-publishing.

Why self-publishing? Really, aren’t there several books out there that deal with the subject? There are, and I’ve read most of them. Many of the books available focus on either the US or the UK or don’t specify the differences experienced by self-publishers in different countries. That is where this book is different. I will point out the differences and provide as many sources of information I can find for folks in different countries.

Is there a learning curve? 

Yes! 

I do feel the learning curve is reasonable, but in my experience, many well-meaning people scare authors off this path.

I approach the world of authors and publishing differently than most authors.  My background is in teaching science and running a technical training department. I’m a stats geek and I tend to analyze things, to study things. I don’t think things work, I know they do and why they do. I read a lot and I research a lot.  The origins for most of my books have been either a problem point that I discover or a subject that I get a lot of questions on. 

There is no one way to publish a book. 

Maybe that’s what creates confusion in many authors—the number of choices that exist. As you’ll see in this book, I view publishing as steps on a flow chart or as stops on a road map. Steps that are easily identified and described. They are all steps that the average author can carry out—perhaps with a bit of help—but they don’t require any special skill other than some patience and a little bit of stubbornness. There are a variety of choices available for most of the steps. We’ll talk about the choices available and talk about the pros and cons of each.

I think it’s important to let you know what you will learn from this book. We will start off talking about the various types of editing and how to find an editor for your project. We will talk about how to get an ISBN from whatever agency is appropriate for your country. We will talk about what all the various file formats are we will need to publish our book and how to either create them ourselves or how to find a professional formatter. We will learn all about cover graphics and how to find a graphic designer to help create the perfect cover for your book. We will learn how straightforward it is to publish a book to the various retailers where your book will be for sale. We will learn about e-readers and how straightforward they are to use. We will learn about the differences between all the retailers and learn how to get paid. Along the way, we’ll learn the meaning of all those words that published authors use that don’t seem to be part of the normal English language. We’ll learn a bunch of bits and pieces that make the whole thing much easier! And homework. I’ll be assigning homework, but it will be fun homework. Think “reading a book” kind of fun.

Lastly, I’ll give you lots and lots of help. At the end of this book, you’ll find a glossary, a list of resource articles, a list of helpful videos, an extensive list of writers’ groups and a few odds and ends of resource material that I just had to include!

Are you excited to begin? I hope so. Let’s end this introduction with a quote from a group that I will mention several times in this book—the Alliance of Independent Authors.

“What self-publishing doesn’t do is absolve us of the responsibility of learning our craft and our art.” 

~ Alliance of Independent Authors

Barb Drozdowich

is the author of 15 books, over 40 YouTube videos an online Goodreads course and an online WordPress course, all focused on helping authors and bloggers. Barb lives in the mountains of British Columbia with her family.

Learn more about Barb from her

And follow her on  Twitter @sugarbeatbc. 

 

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Thursday teaser: #excerpt from The Author’s Guide to Self-Publishing in Canada

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This week’s teaser excerpt comes from the newest author’s guide

By Barb Drozdowich

Self-publishing—or Indie publishing, as it is also known—is the publishing equalizer. Gate-keepers are removed and authors can publish a book they feel has merit. Along with the removal of many of the gate-keepers, in recent years much of the stigma has also been removed. Authors who choose to publish their own work are capable of having a respectable and successful career as published author.

So…you are interested in learning about self-publishing. Do you use the term “Self-Publishing” or “Indie-Publishing” or “Independent Publishing”? In my mind all these phrases mean the same thing.  They all refer to the act of publishing a book where you are the driver of the operation—you may ask for, and receive, help, but you make all the decisions.

I am the proud author of 15 self-published books, have sold thousands of copies and I am frequently answering questions about or dispelling myths about self-publishing. As a result, I decided to put fingers to keyboard and explain the process of self-publishing in Canada.

Why Canada? To start with, that’s where I live. My second reason is to outline the differences between self-publishing in Canada compared to other countries. There are quite a few books available that talk about self-publishing in the US or in the UK, but we Canadians have some distinct differences from other countries—advantages as well as disadvantages.

Is there a learning curve?

Yes!

I do feel the learning curve is reasonable, but in my experience, many well-meaning people scare authors off this path.

I approach the world of authors and publishing differently than most authors.  My background is in teaching science and running a technical training department. I’m a stats geek and I tend to analyze things, to study things. I don’t *think* things work, I *know* they do and *why* they do. I read a lot and I research a lot.  The origins for most of my books have been either a problem point that I discover or a subject that I get a lot of questions on.

*There is no one way to publish a book. *

Maybe that’s what creates confusion in many authors—the number of choices that exist. As you’ll see in this book, I view publishing as steps on a flow chart or as stops on a road map. Steps that are easily identified and described. They are all steps that the average author can carry out—perhaps with a bit of help—but they don’t require any special skill other than some patience and a little bit of stubbornness. There are a variety of choices available for most of the steps. We’ll talk about the choices available and talk about the pros and cons of each.

I think it’s important to let you know what you will learn from this book. We will start off talking about the various types of editing and how to find an editor for your project. We will talk about how to get a free ISBN from the government—one of the perks of being Canadian! We will talk about what all the various file formats are we will need to publish our book and how to either create them ourselves or how to find a professional formatter. We will learn all about cover graphics and how to find a graphic designer to help create the perfect cover for your book. We will learn how straightforward it is to publish a book to the various retailers where your book will be for sale. We will learn about e-readers and how straightforward they are to use. We will learn about the differences between all the retailers and learn how to get paid. Along the way, we’ll learn the meaning of all those words that published authors use that don’t seem to be part of the normal English language. We’ll learn a bunch of bits and pieces that make the whole thing much easier! And homework. I’ll be assigning homework, but it will be fun homework. Think “reading a book” kind of fun.

Lastly, I’ll give you lots and lots of help. At the end of this book, you’ll find a glossary, a list of resource articles, a list of helpful videos, an extensive list of writers groups and a few odds and ends of resource material that I just had to include!

Are you excited to begin? I hope so. Let’s end this introduction with a quote from a group that I will mention several times in this book—the Alliance of Independent Authors.

*“What self-publishing doesn’t do is absolve us of the responsibility of learning our craft and our art.” *

*~ Alliance of Independent Authors*

About The Author’s Guide to Self-Publishing in Canada

Are you under the impression that self-publishing is just to technical a task for writers to do themselves?

Is your lack of understanding holding you back from self-publishing your book?

The self-publishing world can be overwhelming if you don’t take the time to plan the steps needed to successfully publish your book. That’s where I come in. I have spent many years in the industry and accrued an impressive list of notes and references I’m happy to share to help you on this new adventure.

We’ll start at the beginning- where else? I’ll guide you through formatting, editing, getting your first ISBN, and uploading your manuscripts to the venue of your choice. There will be homework, I was once a science teacher, but it will be fun and hopefully inspirational, too.

So come along with me, and let your new journey to success begin!

An in-depth, perfect guide for every beginning author – a must read! 
~Mimi Barbour, USA Today & NY Times Bestselling Author

Get it from Amazon.

About the author

About the author

Social Media and WordPress consultant Barb Drozdowich has taught in colleges, universities and in the banking industry. More recently, she brings her 15+ years of teaching experience and a deep love of books to help authors develop the social media platform needed to succeed in today’s fast evolving publishing world. She delights in taking technical subjects and making them understandable by the average person. She owns Bakerview Consulting and manages the popular blog, Sugarbeat’s Books, where she talks about romance novels.

She is the author of 10 books, over 30 YouTube videos and an online WordPress course, all focused on helping authors and bloggers. Barb lives in the mountains of British Columbia with her family.

She can be found on her

And follow her on  Twitter @sugarbeatbc.

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New BestSelling release: The Author’s Guide to Self-Publishing for Canadians

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By Barb Drozdowich

Are you under the impression that self-publishing is just to technical a task for writers to do themselves?

Is your lack of understanding holding you back from self-publishing your book?

The self-publishing world can be overwhelming if you don’t take the time to plan the steps needed to successfully publish your book. That’s where I come in. I have spent many years in the industry and accrued an impressive list of notes and references I’m happy to share to help you on this new adventure.

We’ll start at the beginning- where else? I’ll guide you through formatting, editing, getting your first ISBN, and uploading your manuscripts to the venue of your choice. There will be homework, I was once a science teacher, but it will be fun and hopefully inspirational, too.

So come along with me, and let your new journey to success begin!

Now available on Amazon

About the author

Social Media and WordPress Consultant Barb Drozdowich has taught in colleges, universities and in the banking industry. More recently, she brings her 15+ years of teaching experience and a deep love of books to help authors develop the social media platform needed to succeed in today’s fast evolving publishing world. She delights in taking technical subjects and making them understandable by the average person. She owns Bakerview Consulting and manages the popular blog, Sugarbeat’s Books, where she talks about Romance novels.

She is the author of 10 books, over 30 YouTube videos and an online WordPress course, all focused on helping authors and bloggers. Barb lives in the mountains of British Columbia with her family.

She can be found on her Author WebsiteBusiness blogFacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestGoodreads, and YouTube

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Thursday teaser: Blogging for Authors #excerpt

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By Barb Drozdowich

This week’s excerpt comes from Blogging for Authors, one of Barb Drozdowich’s series of books to help authors reach audiences.

Why do I need to blog?

THE QUESTION that comes up repeatedly during my discussions with authors — Why? Why do I need to blog? There are several answers to this question.

At the top of the heap, blogging is a writing exercise, another opportunity to develop that writing muscle. The second reason is to communicate with your readers and develop a community. We’ll talk about more reasons as we progress through the chapters of this book.

We all figured out how to make friends in Kindergarten: “Hi, my name is Barb. Do you want to play with me?” As adults in the electronic world, the way to make friends is admittedly a bit more complicated, but not impossible. It goes something along the lines of, “Hi, my name is Barb and I write books. Let’s chat about interests we have in common over a cup of virtual coffee.”

The third reason, as I mentioned in the previous section, is to communicate and share with your community of readers in a fairly permanent way. Unlike the other parts of your platform, your blog posts can be searched and found months or years after they were first shared. So a post that attracted a new reader into having a virtual chat with you two years ago could easily be found today and have the same effect on a new reader.

Your blog is your public face to the world. In today’s society if we want to find out more about a public figure, we “Google” them. Frankly, we expect all public figures including authors to have a website of some sort where we can find out more about them and their books. As we’ll find out in the coming chapters, it’s important to have a blog, but generally not necessary to have a website and a blog. A blog offers an author the ability to add fresh content on a regular basis to their site – something that Google LOVES!

Think of Google as a toddler. For those parents reading this, you realize that toddlers don’t stay interested in anything for long. Even shiny, new toys are quickly abandoned for the box they came in. Google is similar. Google is attracted to new content. A blog that’s posted to on a regular basis provides a steady stream of “shiny new toys” for the Google search engine. This helps a site rise up the ranks in a Google search. While it’s true that the majority of traffic to your blog will initially either come from your friends or be referral traffic from other social media, you want readers to be able to Google the genre they read and find your site in a search. We’ll talk more about this in a future chapter.

I often take people by surprise when I tell them that a country that I sell a lot of books in is India. As I’ll mention several times in this book, as beginner authors, we picture our books for sale in our local bookstore or at most, being sold to readers in our own country. As soon as our books are available online, they are available for sale in most countries in the world. India is considered to be one of the fastest expanding markets for books. I’m not going to be hopping on a plane to India any time soon, but I can interact with my readers in India or any other country by posting to by blog. No leaving the house necessary!

One last comment for this section is about tone and language. As I’ve mentioned previously, I feel that your blog should be a conversation — a dialogue with your readers. A blog post that’s a dialogue with your readers is typically casual in its language and tone, like a conversation between friends. It’s meant to share information as you would over a cup of coffee or a glass of beer with your friends. If your blog post is more formal, it will sound like a dissertation or even a monologue. It may end up conveying information to an audience, but it typically won’t turn your audience into a community. In short, your audience will react differently. Think about how you react when reading let’s say a Wikipedia page. You’re looking for information and you get it. Compare this to reading a chatty, personalized blog post. You’ll have a different internal reaction.

I’ll continue to remind you to keep the word “dialogue” in your mind as we go through this book. I find when you think of something as a dialogue, that is what you create.

About Blogging for Authors

Do you want to find more readers for your book?

Do you feel uncertain about the technology or what to blog about?

Technical trainer Barb Drozdowich has been blogging for the better part of a decade & knows what authors need.

Finding readers is the key to success. One of the best ways to connect with these readers is through the establishment of a blog – one that isn’t just a billboard for sales & releases, but a method for establishing long term relationships with readers.

In award winning Blogging for Authors, Barb teaches not just how to set up a blog but how to turn it into a powerful tool of communication with readers. She brings several decades of teaching experience to help even the beginner author.

In this book you’ll discover:

  • How blogging can help with communication with reader
  • How to create powerful topics to blog about that generate shareable content
  • How to create optimized blog posts that will get people talking
  • How to protect & backup your content to keep your site safe for years to come.

Through a series of free tools & helpful hints, Blogging for Authors helps you choose the right platform, understand the technical aspects & get started today.

If you like an easy to understand book that cuts through the technobabble that exists in many tech manuals, this book is for you!

Pick up this great deal today & start connecting with readers right away. 

Get it on Amazon.

About the author

Social Media and WordPress consultant Barb Drozdowich has taught in colleges, universities and in the banking industry. More recently, she brings her 15+ years of teaching experience and a deep love of books to help authors develop the social media platform needed to succeed in today’s fast evolving publishing world. She delights in taking technical subjects and making them understandable by the average person. She owns Bakerview Consulting and manages the popular blog, Sugarbeat’s Books, where she talks about romance novels.

She is the author of 10 books, over 30 YouTube videos and an online WordPress course, all focused on helping authors and bloggers. Barb lives in the mountains of British Columbia with her family.

She can be found on her

And follow her on  Twitter @sugarbeatbc.

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