Thursday teaser: Honor Among Thieves

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The newest Dewey Webb Historical Mystery is now out!

By Renée Pawlish

As I sat at my table at a restaurant on Grant Street, I wasn’t thinking about murder. My mind had been on how I was going to pay the stack of bills piled on my office desk. I hadn’t had a lot of work in the last couple of months, and money was tight. It had been wearing on me, and Clara and I had even had an argument about it this morning.

I crushed out my cigarette in an ashtray and started toward the cashier near the restaurant entrance. That’s when I saw a tall man rise from a table near the door. He was vaguely familiar. Then he lit a match by flicking the tip of it off his thumbnail, and I remembered him. Roy Jefferson.

We’d been in the same outfit in the war, in Germany, but once we’d come back stateside, I hadn’t seen him again. I recalled that he was arrogant and a hardhead, quick to anger, and always pushing his superiors. But in the end, he got the job done. He lit his cigarette, blew out the match, and tossed it into an ashtray. As I neared the register, he glanced up and saw me.

“Dewey Webb?” he asked, his brow furrowed.

I nodded. “Roy Jefferson.”

“That’s right.”

He offered his hand. His grip was firm, and he looked dapper in a well-tailored blue pinstripe suit, but his brown eyes were guarded.

“I didn’t know you lived in Denver,” I said.

“I moved here a while back. What’re you doing?”

I pulled some ones from my wallet and handed them to the cashier. “I’m a private detective.”

“No kidding?” He nodded appreciatively. “You were a good guy in the war, and you could handle situations and people. I can see how you’d be a good investigator.”

“It’s a living.”

He waited, and after I’d paid my bill, he paid his, and we walked outside. It was a chilly November Monday, and I was between jobs and didn’t have anywhere to be. He pulled his fedora down over his brown hair.

“It’s been a while since the war,” he said as he smoked.

That was a topic I didn’t want to discuss. I motioned toward Twelfth Avenue. “I’m parked over there.”

“I’ll walk with you, if that’s okay.” He hesitated, then glanced around nervously. “There’s something I’d like to talk to you about. You being a private eye.”

I gave him the slightest of once-overs, suddenly wondering if our chance encounter wasn’t by chance at all. “All right, why don’t you come to my office and we can talk.”

He stared across the street, bit his lip, then shook his head. “I’ve got to get back to work. How about you come over to my place tonight, say five o’clock?”

I gave him a hard look. “What’s going on?”

“Nothing. It’s just … something I need from you, okay?” He pulled an envelope from his pocket. “What’s your retainer?”

I named my daily fee.

“Good.” He held out the envelope. “That should more than cover it. Come over and hear what I have to say. If you don’t want to help, the money’s yours just for your trouble.”

His eyes darted around nervously. I contemplated him for a moment, then took the envelope and opened it. The money was enough to pay me for a week. I looked at him.

“Are you up to something illegal?” I finally asked.

He held up a hand. “Not at all. Hey, you were a solid guy during the war, and I think you’ll want to hear this deal.” He glanced at his watch. “I’ve got to go. Tonight. Five o’clock. The address is on the envelope.” With that, he spun around and hurried down the street. He turned the corner and was gone.

About Honor Among Thieves

It’s 1949, and Denver private investigator Dewey Webb isn’t thinking about murder, he’s pondering the stack of bills he can’t pay. Then he runs into an old army acquaintance, Roy Jefferson, who is well-dressed, flashing cash, and wanting Dewey’s help. Dewey has his suspicions, however, Roy pays him substantially just to meet him later and hear his problem. Dewey agrees, but before they can talk, Roy dies, an apparent suicide. But is that the case?

Since Dewey has taken Roy’s money, he feels honor-bound to look into Roy’s death. What Dewey discovers leads him to believe someone from Roy’s sordid past may have murdered him. And that same someone may now be after Dewey as well. As Dewey works to find a possible killer, he’s forced to question many things, including his own sense of honor.

Honor Among Thieves is a hard-boiled, historical mystery that’s great for fans who love a traditional detective crime story with a noir flavor, but without a lot of sex or swearing.

Dewey Webb first appeared in the Reed Ferguson mystery, Back Story. Pick up a copy of to find out more about this classic hard-boiled detective.

About the author

Renée Pawlish is the award-winning author of the bestselling Reed Ferguson mystery series, horror bestseller Nephilim Genesis of Evil, The Noah Winters YA Adventure series, middle-grade historical novel This War We’re In, Take Five, a short story collection, and The Sallie House: Exposing the Beast Within, a nonfiction account of a haunted house investigation.

Renée has been called “a promising new voice to the comic murder mystery genre” and “a powerful storyteller.” Nephilim Genesis of Evil has been compared to Stephen King and Frank Peretti.

Renée was born in California, but has lived most of her life in Colorado.

Find more about Renée and her books on

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Thursday teaser: Nightmare Sally—The latest Reed Ferguson mystery

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By Renée Pawlish

She looked nervous.

That was my first impression as I watched her for a moment from the entryway of the Cherry Hills Country Club restaurant.

“May I help you, sir?” a hostess in dark slacks and a white blouse asked me.

“I’m meeting someone,” I said, then gestured at the woman, who was sitting near a window across the room.

“Ah, yes. Are you Reed Ferguson?”

I nodded.

“Mrs. Evans is expecting you.”

She escorted me to Mrs. Evans’s table, then said to her, “Your guest has arrived.”

Mrs. Evans thanked the hostess, then indicated I should sit down.

I introduced myself and she smiled.

“Call me Brenda.”

She discreetly sized me up, probably wondering how could this brown-haired guy with boring hazel eyes be a private investigator.

If my guess was correct, Brenda Evans was in her fifties. That was maybe ten years or so younger than my mother, but you wouldn’t have known it by looking at her. Her cream-colored pantsuit hung loosely on her thin frame, her cheeks were hollow, and her short blond hair had a strange quality I couldn’t put my finger on.

“I’ve met you before, but it was a long time ago,” she said.

“I’m sorry, I don’t remember.”

“When your parents lived in Denver, we golfed here at the club with them.”

I nodded, letting her ease into the conversation. A waiter came over and asked if I wanted something to drink. Brenda was sipping coffee, but that wasn’t generally my style, and I asked for a Coke. He nodded and scurried away. It was after one on a beautiful September day, and the restaurant was quiet, only a few other diners in the room. The murmur of their conversations drifted into the background as Brenda and I talked.

“I talked to your mother the other day on the phone and was telling her about my … situation,” she said, “and she suggested I contact you.”

I leaned in a bit. “I’m happy to help if I can.”

“Your mother speaks very highly of you. She says you’re quite the detective.”

“That’s nice to hear.”

And it was. My parents had been slow to warm up to the idea of my being a private investigator, but now that I had been in the business for several years, they were coming around. Brenda interrupted my thoughts.

“But she does say that she worries about your getting into dangerous situations.”

There it is, I thought. That was the one thing with my mother that wouldn’t go away. She always assumed that when I was working on a case, somehow I would end up getting hurt. I’m sure she was sitting on the balcony of her Florida condo right now, wondering what kind of precarious situation I was in.

Brenda smiled. “I assure you, there’s nothing dangerous in what I’m asking you to do.”

“Okay,” I said. “What do you need?”

“I want you to get a message to my daughter.”

I watched her twist a gold ring on a bony finger. The waiter returned with my Coke and asked if I wanted anything to eat. Brenda wasn’t eating, so I declined.

“We – my husband, Joel, and I,” she continued after the waiter left, “haven’t had contact with her in months. She barely talks to us.” Sadness spread across her pale face.

“What’s her name?”

“Sally. I don’t think you ever met her.”

I couldn’t recall if I had. “Tell me about her.”

About Nightmare Sally

Reed Ferguson’s latest case could be a nightmare!

When Brenda Evans asks private investigator Reed Ferguson to deliver a message to her estranged daughter, Sally, Reed thinks this will be the easiest case he’s ever had. Unfortunately, Sally has moved without leaving a forwarding address. When Reed finally finds Sally, she happens to be the prime suspect in a murder. Sally claims she’s innocent, and Brenda wants Reed to prove it.

Reed’s investigation leads him through the seedy side of Denver, involving ex-cons, a masked social media personality, and back to Sally, who has secrets of her own. One thing is certain: danger is at every turn as Reed hunts for the killer.

Nightmare Sally is a suspense-filled mystery, with a Bogie-wannabe detective, a lots of humor, and a clever homage to film noir. From the award-wining author of This Doesn’t Happen In The Movies. Great for fans who love a fast-paced, humorous read, without a lot of swearing or sex.

Published this week on Amazon.

About the author

Renée Pawlish is the award-winning author of the bestselling Reed Ferguson mystery series, horror bestseller Nephilim Genesis of Evil, The Noah Winters YA Adventure series, middle-grade historical novel This War We’re In, Take Five, a short story collection, and
The Sallie House: Exposing the Beast Within, a nonfiction account of a haunted house investigation.

Renée has been called “a promising new voice to the comic murder mystery genre” and “a powerful storyteller”. Nephilim Genesis of Evil has been compared to Stephen King and Frank Peretti.

Renée was born in California, but has lived most of her life in Colorado.

Renée can be found:

And follow her on Twitter @ReneePawlish.

 

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Year-end Teasers: The 2016 spotlight

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Your favorite bestselling authors have been very busy over the past 12 months. Altogether, BestSelling Reads member authors have published 46 titles. Here’s a quick look back at all the great reading available for your enjoyment this year.

Claude Bouchard

Scott Bury

Barb Drozdowich

Julie C. Gilbert

DelSheree Gladden

Emily Kimelman

Emily’s Sydney Rye Kindle World also launched in May 2016.

Seb Kirby

 

Toby Neal

Renée Pawlish

Kathleen Valentine

Even though Kathleen passed away at the end of October, she published two books in 2016:

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Monday musings: Looking back on 2016

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Photo courtesy of Jannes Pockele (Creative Commons)

By Renée Pawlish

2016 has been a busy year for me. I started the year by publishing the first novel in the Dewey Webb historical mystery series. Dewey Webb first appeared in a Reed Ferguson mystery, Back Story, and I thought it would be fun to develop Dewey into a spin-off series. This year, I published three Dewey mysteries (Web of Deceit, Murder in Fashion, Secrets and Lies). The stories take place in the late 1940s, and it’s been fun to write the stories, but also challenging to make them as historically accurate as possible. I’ve been blessed with a few beta readers who grew up in the Denver area, and they’ve helped me with tips on Denver during that time, and they’ve also corrected some of my mistakes. When I started this series, I didn’t know if it would take off or not, but I’ve been pleasantly surprised. Readers seem to like Dewey, and I plan to write at least three or four more in the series.

I’ve also continued the Reed Ferguson mystery series, adding two more novels, two novellas, and a short story. The challenge for this series is to keep Reed fresh. I always thought I would stop this series at eight books, but I’m about to release the fifteenth book in the series. With each new novel, I try to come up with a new and interesting premise, and make sure that Reed’s supporting cast is involved in fun ways (my readers love the cast around Reed almost as much as Reed himself). I don’t plot out my stories ahead of time, and it’s refreshing to see what’s in store for all the characters.  

One of the things I challenged myself to do in 2016 was to release a novel every other month, and a short story or novella in the months between those releases. I wasn’t able to do this the entire year, but I came close. It’s not been easy, but when I’m writing a novel, I try to keep to a goal of writing one chapter per day. I don’t ever hit this, and a day here or there gets missed, but overall I am able to write a novel in about six weeks. For me, that’s about as fast as I can write a book and still feel that it’s a quality product. I’d like to keep up this schedule in 2017, but I’ll only do it if I feel like I’m still producing good stories, and if my readers say the stories are good. If not, it’s time to slow down.

Finally, I’ve had my best sales year yet, and I am very pleased with that. Amazon continues to make things challenging for authors, but I’ve still done well. I hope that this growth continues in 2017 and beyond.

Thanks for reading.

Renée Pawlish is the award-winning author of the bestselling Reed Ferguson mystery series, horror bestseller Nephilim Genesis of Evil, The Noah Winters YA Adventure series, middle-grade historical novel This War We’re In, Take Five, a short story collection, and
The Sallie House: Exposing the Beast Within, a nonfiction account of a haunted house investigation.

Visit Renée’s

And follow her on Twitter @reneepawlish.

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Thursday Teaser: Small Town Focus

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The latest Reed Ferguson mystery

By Renée Pawlish

smalltownfocusShe got right to the point. “I think my father might have killed my mother.”

That wasn’t what I’d expected to hear. “Why do you say that?”

She frowned. “I guess that’s not the best way to start the conversation.” Gina Smith let out a little nervous laugh. “Something odd is going on.”

“I’m an only child. According to my father, my mother left us when I was a few weeks old. We moved to Colorado shortly after that, and he raised me by himself.”

“He never remarried?”

“No.”

“Has your father ever said why your mother left?”

She shrugged. “He’s been very vague, and said that she was unhappy, and she had some problems. It’s a touchy subject, but when I’ve asked questions, he tells me that the past is in the past, that he loves me enough for both of them, and that I should let it go.”

I studied her for a few seconds. “But you’ve had a hard time doing that.”

“Yes. Dad doesn’t even have a picture of my mother, let alone anything that belonged to her. And he never even told me her name. It’s like he cut her completely out of his life, so she’s a complete mystery to me, and that’s always made it hard. I have an intense desire to know more about her, to know what she looked like, what things made her who she was, and what made her tick.”

“And what made her leave.”

“Yes,” she said softly. She took another drink, and stared at me with intense brown eyes.

“This is all intriguing,” I said, then hesitated. “But I still don’t see why you think your father may have killed your mother.”

“There’s more,” she said.

“I’m listening.”

“A couple of weeks ago, I was visiting Dad and I went into the den. The news was on, and the anchor was talking about skeletal remains of a body that had been found in a field east of Denver. Based on the size of the bones, the authorities thought it was probably a woman. You should have seen the look on Dad’s face. He was in shock, just staring at the screen with his jaw open. I spoke to him three times before he noticed I was there, and his face was as white as a ghost. I asked him about the remains, and he snapped at me to shut up.” Pain wrinkled the corners of her eyes. “He never talks to me like that. I asked him why the news was upsetting him, and he told me it was nothing, and he changed the subject. Then, the next time I was there, a few days later, I overheard him on the phone. I have no idea who he was talking to, but he said something about the woman in the field, and about it being taken care of, and she was never supposed to be found. He was furious.” She tapped the table for emphasis. “He was talking about that woman.”

I gazed into her pleading face. “Okay,” I finally said. “I’ll look into it.”

Although her dad had certainly been acting strangely, I doubted there was anything sinister behind his behavior, but it would be easy enough to find out, and put her mind at ease.

How wrong I was.

About Small Town Focus

Reed Ferguson is back!

“I think my father might have killed my mother.”

With this one sentence, Gina Smith immediately draws Denver private investigator Reed Ferguson into a case. Questioning her past and yearning to find the mother she’s never met, Gina hires Reed to find answers. With the help of his wife, Willie, his best friend Cal, and the always amusing Goofball Brothers, Reed’s search for Gina’s mother leads him to a rural Colorado town and a puzzling mystery that involves a decades-old kidnapping, a powerful small-town mayor, a seductively charming pastor, and an unsolved murder. And if Reed isn’t careful, the murderer’s focus could turn to him.

Small Town Focus is a suspense-filled mystery, with a Bogie-wannabe detective, a dose of humor, and a clever homage to film noir. From the award-wining author of This Doesn’t Happen In The Movies.

Great for fans who love a fast-paced, humorous read, without a lot of swearing or sex.

About the author

Renee PawlishRenée Pawlish is the award-winning author of the bestselling Reed Ferguson mystery series, horror bestseller Nephilim Genesis of Evil, The Noah Winters YA Adventure series, middle-grade historical novel This War We’re In, Take Five, a short story collection, and
The Sallie House: Exposing the Beast Within, a nonfiction account of a haunted house investigation.

Renée has been called “a promising new voice to the comic murder mystery genre” and “a powerful storyteller”. Nephilim Genesis of Evil has been compared to Stephen King and Frank Peretti.

Renée was born in California, but has lived most of her life in Colorado.

Visit Renée’s

And follow her on Twitter @ReneePawlish.

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Win 10 BestSelling Reads books on an iPad Air 2

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Send us the first line of Chapter 4 from your favorite BestSelling Reads book for a chance to win a brand new iPad Air 2 loaded with the Kindle Reader and 10 books by Bestselling Reads authors.

bsr-2016giveawayad

To be eligible to win the prize, you must email the first line of Chapter 4 from any book by one of the authors in the list above. It doesn’t have to be one of the books on the iPad Air 2 — in fact, it’s better if it’s a different one.

All you have to do is go to any book in any format by one of those authors, turn to the first page of Chapter 4 and copy the first line into an email to contest@bestsellingreads.com. All correct entries before the end of October 30, 2016 will be eligible to win.

Need more help? Follow these links to the contest authors’ websites to see more of their books.

We look forward to your entries!

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Thursday teaser: Web of Deceit

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You could WIN a free e-copy of Web of Deceit. Find out how at the end of the excerpt.

WebOfDeceitI’d never heard of Gordon Sandalwood until he walked up to my booth at State Bar & Grill and slid into the seat across from me.

“This table’s taken, bub,” I said. I had been enjoying my lunch while I read The Denver Post – four years after the war and there was still trouble in Germany – and I wasn’t in the mood to be disturbed. Reminders of the war tended to leave me with a foul disposition.

“Dewey Webb?” he asked, but it wasn’t a question. He knew who I was.

I leaned back and contemplated him. He was neat and tidy, in a gray suit and a white shirt with blue stripes, a blue tie and a gray wool trilby hat. A gray tweed overcoat was draped over one arm. I’m sure people instinctively called him ‘Sir.’ ”

“Okay, you know my name,” I finally said. I wasn’t going to say ‘Sir.’ I hadn’t done that since I was in the Marines. “How about telling me yours?”

“Gordon Sandalwood.”

He took off his hat and set it and the overcoat on the seat next to him, then reached a thin hand across the table. I waited just long enough so he’d know I was still annoyed that he was interrupting me, then firmly shook the hand.

“Okay.” I pointed a finger at him. “Now I know who you are. What do you want?”

“I need a moment of your time, Mr. Webb,” he said.

I gestured at my hot roast beef sandwich. “Can’t it wait?”

He sighed heavily. “You’re a private investigator, and I need your help.”

“Why not come to my office?” After the war, I’d been an investigator for a law firm, but a year ago, I’d gone out on my own. I had a place on Sherman Street in an old Victorian house that had been converted to offices. It wasn’t much, but it was private, and it was where I should be conducting business.

He shook his head as he took out a Chesterfield and lit it. He blew smoke off to the side, then said, “I did. Twice. I got as far as your door, but couldn’t bring myself to go in. The second time, I ran into you in the hallway, but I didn’t say anything.”

I gave him a good once-over. “I remember you. It was last week, right?” He’d been dressed in brown that time, from his shoes to his hat. I wondered if he was always perfectly color-coordinated.

He nodded. “Then today, I’d finally screwed up my courage to talk to you, but when I got to your office, you were just leaving. So I followed you here.”

I folded up my paper and pushed it aside. The article about Ted Williams winning the AL MVP would have to wait. “It must be something important if it couldn’t wait any longer.”

“It is.” His face twisted up with a pained expression. “It’s not easy to ask for help.”

“But you’re here, so shoot.”

“It’s my wife.”

I folded my arms, beginning to lose patience with him. “I’m listening.”

About Web of Deceit

MurderFashionCover

Web of Deceit is the first Dewey Webb mystery. Book 2, Murder in Fashion, is now available on Amazon. Check it out!

It’s 1949. World War II is over, but it has a way of haunting people for years to come.

Gordon Sandalwood suspects his wife Edith is hiding something from him, and he asks Denver private investigator Dewey Webb to find out what. Dewey, toughened by his own war experiences, reluctantly takes the case, certain it will lead to nothing. But when he sees Edith rendezvous with a mysterious man, Dewey realizes his assumptions might be wrong. As he digs deeper to identify the stranger, he turns up secrets that reach back into the war, and as he unravels a web of deceit, he discovers who has the most to gain, and the most to lose.

A hard-boiled, historical mystery that’s great for fans who love a traditional detective crime story with a noir flavor, but without a lot of sex or swearing.

Get it on Amazon.

How to win a free e-copy

Renée Pawlish will choose three winners from those who leave a comment, below, answering this question:

Why do you love detective stories?

About the author

Renee PawlishRenée Pawlish is the award-winning author of the bestselling Reed Ferguson mystery series, horror bestseller Nephilim Genesis of Evil, The Noah Winters YA Adventure series, middle-grade historical novel This War We’re In, Take Five, a short story collection, and The Sallie House: Exposing the Beast Within, a nonfiction account of a haunted house investigation.

Read her full bio on her BestSelling Reads Author page.

Also visit Renée’s

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Book launch today: Road Blocked

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A Reed Ferguson Mystery by Renée Pawlish

Launching May 10!

Road BlockedReed Ferguson returns in a gripping tale!

A dead body on a beach in Tahiti. A Medicare scam. A doctor who believes hired killers are after him. It’s all part of Denver private investigator Reed Ferguson’s latest case, where he matches wits with a dangerous adversary who will stop at nothing short of murder. Working with his wife Willie, and his quirky friends, Reed must unearth a killer before he becomes the next victim.

Road Blocked is a suspense-filled mystery, with a Bogie-wannabe detective, a dose of humor, and a clever homage to film noir. It’s available today from Amazon.

From the award-wining author of This Doesn’t Happen In The Movies.

 

 

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A multi-Teaser Thursday

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The Sydney Rye Kindle World

Five BestSelling Reads authors are releasing new books today in the brand-new Sydney Rye Kindle World, based on the series by another BSR member, Emily Kimelman. So for Teaser Thursday, we’ll tease you with just a snippet from each one.

Visit the Sydney Rye Kindle World

Scott Bury: The Wife LineWifeLine-final-small

Sydney jumped off the branch, landing ten feet below beside Blue. “Hunt,” she said, pointing along the wall toward the front of the estate. Blue sprang ahead, disappearing into the darkness under the trees. Sydney ran as fast as she could behind him, but of course could not keep up with the big dog.

She rounded the corner of the wall, arriving in a small clearing surrounded by bushes, still invisible to anyone in the manor. She had expected to find Blue pinning the shadowy figure to the ground, standing on his chest and growling into his face.

Instead, the wan light that filtered through the leaves from the manor showed Blue in classic play posture: butt high in the air, tail wagging furiously, front paws and head low to the ground, head tilted slightly to one side. In front of him was a man in the same posture, or as close as a human being could get to doggie pose: on his hands and knees, butt high, head low.

Julie Gilbert: Fatal Interest

FatalInterestWOI cursed, or at least I tried to. I think it came out as fudge as my brain was still working off Nadia’s child-friendly list. Kicking the door so I wouldn’t break my hand, I shouted for Carly to open the door. Hearing the sound of disengaging locks, I stopped kicking the door and waited.

Carly opened the door and waved me in.

“She’s not here,” she said wearily. “I told her not go, but she doesn’t listen to me. I mean it’s like she’s not even the same person anymore. She’s so moody and withdrawn.”

“Where is she this time?” I demanded.

“She snuck off with David Richter,” said a voice from behind me.

DelSheree Gladden: The Catalyst

CatalystCoverPicking my phone back up, I brought up the latest news stories, found nothing overly interesting, then wondered about the girl Lauren had asked me to look out for. It took me a few seconds to remember the name.

Typing “Eliza Carlisle” into the news app, I hit the search button and sighed when the results loaded. “Local culinary student plays key part in solving 50-year-old murder.” That wouldn’t have sounded so ominous if not for the pictures and videos accompanying the headline. Anything involving SWAT couldn’t be good. My mind decided it had had enough and was ready to shut off. Ditching my phone, I crawled back under my blankets and closed my eyes. Lauren’s favor just got a whole lot more complicated.

Toby Neal: Rough Road

RoughRoadCoverShe reached the top and turned, slowing her steps. Her shoes sank in loose, deep sand as she paused, leaning over to rest her hands on her knees and look back.

The two men were already returning to the car. Fernando looked right at her as he opened the door of the truck. He reached in and pulled Amy up by her hair. Looking right at Lei, he flourished his huge Buck knife against her friend’s neck. Lei gasped, covering her mouth with her hands.

He was trying to make her return, by holding Amy hostage.

If Lei went back, he’d just have two girls to torture. If Lei found help, one of them at least might survive. But was she just justifying leaving Amy there to suffer? Lei’s mouth was chalky with the horror of her dilemma.

Renée Pawlish: Walk Softly, Danger

WalkSoftlyCoverThe woman on the corner took a few steps toward Gage, then stopped and sauntered back to the corner. I kept binoculars in the backseat, and I pulled them out and trained them on her. I guessed she was in her late twenties or early thirties, and she wore jeans and a gray jacket. But what struck me was her left eye. In the fading light it was difficult to tell, but it looked like there was some scarring around it, as if she’d been on the losing end of a vicious fight.

“My money is good,” Zubov interrupted me. “I want you to find out what happened to my daughter.”

This didn’t look promising. But Zubov seemed so sincere…and heartbroken. I got out of the 4-Runner. “Wait here.”

Get all the Sydney Rye Kindle World e-books from Amazon.

What is a Kindle World?

SRKWbadge3Kindle Worlds is an Amazon initiative that allows authors to publish stories set in another author’s fictional universe. The Sydney Rye Kindle World is based on the characters and situations created by bestselling author Emily Kimelman.

The Sydney Rye series of vigilante mysteries feature a strong female lead and her rescue dog, Blue. It is recommended for the 18+ who enjoy some violence, a dash of sex and don’t mind a little salty language. Not to mention an awesome, rollicking good mystery with tons of action that will keep you reading late into the night!

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Teaser Thursday: Web of Deceit

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By BestSelling Reads’ newest member author, Renée Pawlish

Renée Pawlish has just joined BestSelling Reads, and has also just launched a brand-new mystery series.

WebOfDeceit

It’s 1949. World War II is over, but it has a way of haunting people for years to come.

Gordon Sandalwood suspects his wife Edith is hiding something from him, and he asks Denver private investigator Dewey Webb to find out what. Dewey, toughened by his own war experiences, reluctantly takes the case, certain it will lead to nothing. But when he sees Edith rendezvous with a mysterious man, Dewey realizes his assumptions might be wrong. As he digs deeper to identify the stranger, he turns up secrets that reach back into the war, and as he unravels a web of deceit, he discovers who has the most to gain, and the most to lose.

Dewey Webb first appeared in the Reed Ferguson mystery, Back Story. Pick up a copy of Back Story to find out more about this classic hard-boiled detective.

Get it exclusively from Amazon.

About the author

bio croppedRenée Pawlish is the award-winning author of the bestselling Reed Ferguson mystery series, the Dewey Webb mystery series, horror bestseller Nephilim Genesis of Evil, and other series for young adults and younger audiences.

Renée was born in California, but has lived most of her life in Colorado.

Read her full bio on her BestSelling Reads Author page.

Also visit Renée’s

 

 

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