Monday musings: Advice for aspiring and experienced authors

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By Dawn Torrens

I am a full-time author and an occasional headline reviewer for BBC Radio WM 95.6 FM. I have written and published 14 books in various romantic genres over the past six years, including the bestselling Amelia’s Story.

Inspiration

My inspiration comes from many different areas of my life. It could be a dream I had the night before, which sows the seed of a story in my mind. One of my books, Broken Wings, was born from such a dream! I may read a news article, or take a simple walk in the park and something I witness can spark an idea for my next story.

Inspiration can come from anywhere or anything if you walk through life with your eyes wide open. I pay attention to my surroundings and current affairs issues. All of which provide me with inspiration.

Advice for aspiring writers

My first piece of advice would be, NEVER GIVE UP. If you have a dream, then pursue it regardless of what others think. Remember it is your dream, not theirs.

Secondly, no matter how good you think you are at editing your own work, always hire a professional editor and proofreader. Your work will one day be up for public viewing and you want those all-important reviews to be in favour of you, not against you. I cannot stress enough the importance of this. Remember, it is your reputation on the line so you want your work to be as word perfect as it can be.

Thirdly, good writers are also avid readers too. Read and read as often as you can. See how other successful authors form their stories, introduce their characters and back stories. Pay attention to the flow and movement of their story. You will be surprised how much you can learn yourself as an aspiring writer by reading great authors’ work.

Promotion: advice is for new and aspiring authors

Ah… Promotion, promotion, promotion—very important. If people don’t know about your book or books, how will you sell them?

Use your Facebook fan page to offer monthly giveaways to your fans. If you do not have one, create one now, even if your book is not yet published. Get the word out about your debut novel, create interest before it is published and get people excited about it.

People love giveaways, so offer a special new release giveaway to help generate interest. This will encourage word to spread about your book and your author name.

Your author name is your brand. That is what you have to build on. Offer your Kindle book up for free occasionally (you need to be enrolled into Amazon’s KDP programme for this) or reduce the price to 99p or 99c.

There are many book promotional sites out there, which have thousands of avid readers on their mailing lists just waiting to be notified about discounted and free books. This is a great way to get your unheard of book and name out there into the big world. Sites such as BookBub have millions of subscribers. They are very picky and you may have to be patient and submit your book several times over a period of time before they accept you. They are costly though, so you would need to budget for their promotions, but trust me they are so worth it and can get your book into the hands of 20, 30 and 40 thousand readers in one day.

There are other smaller and cheaper sites too, such as Robin Reads, Freebooksy, Bargainbooksy, Booksends, Ereader News Today, Digital Book Today, Kindle Promos, Armadillo Books, Pixel of Ink, Indie Book Today, Adnetwork, Venture Galleries and many more. Look them up and familiarise yourself with them and their submission process and costs. This will help you once you are published and prepare you for your first promotion.

Also, set up your own website—this is your very own promotional platform. Make it interesting and not too cluttered. People want to be able to navigate your site with ease, otherwise they will not visit it again. The main important thing to remember is you have to speculate to accumulate, so budget for promotional costs monthly based on what you can afford, even if it is as little at £10 per month.

Make sure you promote, whether big or small as you need to grow your brand, and get the word out about your brand—YOUR NAME!

Research

Research is so important. You have to know what you are talking about. Because if you don’t, some reader somewhere will pick up on it.

I do tons of research for each and every book I write. If there is a medical condition that my characters get and I do not know much about it, then I research it to death. I also talk to people I know that may suffer from the same condition to get clarity.

I spend a third of my time researching. I love it and gain much knowledge from it too. I am learning about things all the time that I otherwise would not know about such as, places, medical conditions, trauma units, investigations and the process of all these subjects. I also have many methods of research. I try to write about things I have much knowledge about, however, when you write a lot of books you do have to broaden your horizon.

Characters based on real people

Ha,ha… Oh indeed, yes! I know so many interesting characters in my real life that occasionally one or two of them make their way into my books!

Favourite pastimes

My favourite pastimes are jogging, walking, and spending lots of time with my daughter and family. I take part in a lot of charity runs at least four times a year, for Birmingham Children’s Hospital and cancer research, through organisations like, Race for Life and The Great Morrison’s Run. Jogging clears my head and I come up with some great ideas while I am out jogging.

Cover design

I have two cover designers, they are both incredible and each of them has their own special area of expertise: Ares Jun and David C. Cassidy. They are truly amazing cover designers and I would highly recommend them. They are the face of my stories and they convey through their designs perfectly what my stories are about.

My latest book

My latest release is called Amelia the Mother: A Pocket Full of Innocence, the third book in the Amelia series. It tells of Amelia’s emotional journey, showing what motherhood means to her.

Prior to that, I published Forbidden last March. This is a romantic suspense novel, which also touches on real-life happenings. This book was a challenge for me in many ways as I was writing about two characters from two entirely different cultures who fall in love against their families’ wishes. Jessica is white British, and Ajay is Hindu. The obstacles their parents place in their path is incredible. The parents are both strict, traditional Hindus and strict traditional Christians. Both sets of parents do not believe in interracial marriages of relationships of any kind. This makes the protagonists’ relationship very difficult. There are death, near-death and tragic circumstances along the way in this emotionally charged love story against the odds.

Come get to know me

I was born in Yorkshire, England. I currently live in Birmingham. I am married with an eight-year-old daughter, who is my entire world! My very first book, Amelia’s Story has inspired people all over the world and has been downloaded almost 400,000 times worldwide.

I am a prolific writer and in 2013, my works were recognised by BBC Radio WM, where I gave my first live interview on air in the BBC studios in Birmingham, UK. Since that interview, I became a regular on the show, lending my time as a headline reviewer once a week, discussing the day’s headlines with the presenter.

I live by the motto, “The child first and foremost.”

Visit my website, My books & I, and my Facebook author page, and follow me on  Twitter @Torrenstp.

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Monday musings: My literary evolution

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By Elise Stokes

How have I evolved as a writer over the last five years, Scott Bury asked me. It’s a timely question, as I’m about to publish my fifth book YA book, Cassidy Jones & the Eternal Flame. So I’ve decided to answer his questions here.

How many books have you written?

Five—all in Cassidy Jones Adventures. The first installment, Cassidy Jones and the Secret Formula, was published in 2010.

Written for a young adult audience, the series follows the life of teenage superhero Cassidy Jones. Each installment introduces a new mystery with plenty of pulse-pounding action, while continuing ongoing storylines.

How have the main characters developed or changed over the course of the series?

Cassidy has become more comfortable in her own skin and a powerful force to be reckoned with, though she has retained her naïve charm. She is fierce and loyal to a fault.

Emery Phillips’s “human-ness” leaks out more. He is still a Junior James Bond, but the reader is allowed glimpses behind his self-possessed veneer. As Cassidy sums Emery up in Eternal Flame: “Standing before me was a kid who didn’t have anything figured out any better than I did.”

How has your style changed over that same period?

As with any creative endeavor, the more you do it, the better you get. I don’t know if my writing style has changed per se. My skill has improved.

Has the way you write, or your process, evolved? For example, do you use outlines more or less now? What about the way you create characters or build worlds?

My writing process is as it has always been: chaotic. I don’t outline, or even think deeply about my stories. I just write and see what happens. Ideas and characters leap into my head as I’m writing, and sometimes I need to hit reverse and back way up, and sometimes something truly awesome develops because I wasn’t set on a particular course. I wouldn’t recommend this “free-spirited” approach. It isn’t efficient or productive, and it’s rather stressful to be frank, but for whatever reason it works for me.

When do you write? Is there a time of day, or a period during the week? A particular place you like to be to write?

I write when I have free time, which there never seems enough of. My brain is rendered to mush in the evenings, so I have to carve out time to write in the early morning or throughout the day between work and household tasks.

How do you create new characters?

I don’t know. They’re just suddenly there, and I learn more about their complexities with time.

Where do your ideas for plots originate?

Usually from an interesting conversation with my husband. In fact, he planted the seed for Cassidy Jones. Around eight years ago, we were brainstorming different story concepts, and he said, “You know what would be cool? A boy with enhanced senses.” I responded, “You know what would be even cooler? A girl with enhanced senses.”

Cassidy Jones’ and Emery Phillips’s latest adventure, Cassidy Jones & the Eternal Flame, will be out this spring. In the meantime, visit my website to find out more about this exciting series.

Elise Stokes lives with her husband and four children. She was an elementary school teacher before becoming a full-time mom. With a daughter in middle school and two in high school, Elise’s understanding of the challenges facing girls in that age range inspired her to create a series that will motivate girls to value individualism, courage, integrity, and intelligence.

The stories in Cassidy Jones Adventures are fun and relatable, and a bit edgy without taking the reader uncomfortably out of bounds. Cassidy Jones and the Secret Formula, Cassidy Jones and Vulcan’s Gift, Cassidy Jones and the Seventh Attendant, Cassidy Jones and the Luminous, and Cassidy Jones and the Eternal Flame are the first five books in the series.

Visit her:

And follow her on Twitter @CassidyJonesAdv.

 

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Monday musings: Writer—a creator or a narrator?

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By Samreen Ahsan

I’m Samreen Ahsan and I’m the author of multiple award-winning books. Many people who didn’t know me as an author, or who knew me before I started writing have asked me what inspired me to write. Some people also ask how do I develop a story in my mind—is it the start or the end I write first? When you write, is there a specific time of the day or an entire day dedicated to the writing?

Honestly speaking, there are no specific answers to these questions. For me, the rule of writing is: there is NO rule of writing. You don’t create a story—the story comes to you. It’s like a revelation. It can come to you anytime, anywhere. There are some places and events that help you strengthen your storyline, but of course, there is just one thing, one tiny ball of thoughts you need to prick, and boom—the story starts to flow in your mind. The characters talk to you, haunt you in your dreams, stalk you everywhere, asking you to write and write and write. You cannot concentrate anywhere unless you listen to those characters and write whatever they want you to write.

When a reader asks me why certain character acts in such a way, or when someone leaves a review saying, it should have been this or that way—I do not have answers for those comments. The story I wrote is how my characters came to me, the way they behaved, the way they felt. I write whatever they want me to write. It does sound like paranormal activity, and I’m sure many authors would agree how much their characters haunt them, and keep haunting them unless they finish their story. It may sound like a curse, but I find it a blessing.

A Silent Prayer coverIn this way, a writer is never alone. She has the characters to travel everywhere with her. There is an unseen world, parallel to our world, which we, as writers, carry in our heads silently. We see those characters talking to each other, we observe their behaviors, and narrate it.

I love to travel and I always imagine my characters while discovering new places, always thinking What if this particular character were to visit this place. I try to see these places from their point of view.

My first book, A Silent Prayer, is set in city of Toronto, where I live. The places mentioned in the story are based on my personal experience. The plot is based on mythical creatures, the Jinn mentioned in Holy Quran, and part of my faith is also believing in their existence. For some, it may sound like believing in vampires or dragons, but this is how it is. There is no explanation when it comes to faith. You either believe it, or you don’t. Religion does not really provide you any logic.

My second story, Once Upon A [Stolen] Time is a romantic fantasy, set in both modern and medieval England. If you ask me what the inspiration was: just like my main female character, I am also obsessed with castles and palaces. I always wanted to write a story that revolves around a haunted castle but I couldn’t prick that tiny ball of thoughts for some time. Then out of nowhere, I had a dream and I pricked that ball. I caught that one single thread and kept on pulling, until the story was fully developed, and the characters came out of their shells.

I have written romance novels so far but I don’t think this is the only genre I’ll write in the future. It depends on what kind of character comes into my mind and what kind of incident triggers the story.

There are some characters in my stories that change drastically. When I write about them, I am also surprised at how much they have developed from the start of the story to the end. The entire story doesn’t come at once. It comes in phases and sometimes what you’ve thought at initial stages, the story takes a totally different turn when you actually write it. It’s those characters that argue with you and want their way and you have no other choice than to listen to your characters and let them lead the story.

For me, I’m just the narrator for my characters, helping them fabricate their story, and showing it to the world.

For some information about me, visit my BestSelling Reads Author page. For my books, please visit my website: http://www.samreenahsan.com. You can also find me on my

And follow me on Twitter @samauthorcanada.

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Monday musings: The method behind my madness

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By Raine Thomas

With pre-orders for my latest release, Imperfect Harmony (House of Archer #1), just going live, I’ve been reflecting on the time and effort it took to begin this new series. My readers are embarking on this rocker romance journey with me, and many of them are curious about my writing process and how the House of Archer series came about. Since other BSR authors have taken the plunge and answered specific questions about their books and writing styles, today I thought I’d take a turn.

Here’s the scoop:

How many books have you written?

Imperfect Harmony is my thirteenth published novel.

Please explain your various series and standalone books.

My Estilorian series is YA fantasy romance and currently includes seven books. The first three are the Daughters of Saraqael Trilogy, followed by the Firstborn Trilogy, and then the latest book, Deceive. This is one of my most popular series. It has won multiple awards and the first three books have been optioned for film.

I also have a New Adult Sci-Fi series called the Ascendant series. It won an award for Best Sci-Fi Book and is right up there with the Estilorian series in terms of popularity.

My single-most bestselling book, however, is For Everly, a standalone contemporary baseball romance. It has a companion novel, also a standalone, called Meant for Her, which is written in the same setting and has appearances by the characters in For Everly.

For now, though, my focus is on my latest series, House of Archer, a rock star contemporary romance series that I’ve loved writing! Imperfect Harmony is book one.

How have the main characters developed or changed over the course of the series?

What I did in my Estilorian series is switch the main characters within each book. All of the characters remain in the stories and the world, but switching the main characters gives me more flexibility with growing the series. In the Ascendant series, the two main characters grow together, overcoming many challenges and becoming stronger for that.

Has the way you write, or your process, evolved?

I have definitely fine-tuned my writing process. My first books were written with loose outlines. Now I tend to create very detailed ones. The outlines might take me a couple of months to complete, but then the writing is often done within a few weeks.

What about the way you create characters or build worlds?

This process hasn’t changed for me. I always begin my stories by creating detailed character sketches, which includes their world. I use images I find online, research settings, and brainstorm on personality traits. It’s all a ton of fun to me!

When do you write? Is there a time of day, or a period during the week?

Since I work full-time, most of my writing is done in the evenings and on weekends. My family often has to drag me away from my computer to get time with me, which can be a hardship on all of us. Fortunately, they’re very understanding and supportive!

Is there a particular place you like to be to write?

As long as I have my laptop and a pair of headphones to listen to Spotify, I’m good to go!

~    ~     ~

Care to check out Imperfect Harmony, the first book in my House of Archer series? You can pre-order it on Amazon now:

And you can connect with me on:

Website  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  Pinterest  |  Tumblr  |  Instagram  |  YouTube  |  Goodreads  |Linkedin  |  Tsu

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Monday musings: peering through the fog

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Misty Foggy Road Mystery Fog

As I drove through an extremely foggy morning last week, I thought of all the people who try to make predictions about the future at the beginning of every year. It struck me that it’s like trying to tell which way an unfamiliar road will curve when you can only see 30 metres ahead.

If there’s one thing that 2016 taught me, it’s to keep my predictions to myself. But I have read a number of others’ forecasts for the directions and the curves the writing game will take in the next year.

These predictions may seem pretty safe, but what’s interesting is the way they fit together to have an impact on readers as well as writers.

Amazon’s dominance will grow

Amazon has been the number one retailer of books (and a whole lot of other stuff, too) for years, and this market dominance is only going to increase.

Retail sales are also suffering, and “brick and mortar” retailers are losing market share to online retailers—like Amazon, but also to others, even their own online operations. Barnes & Noble reported its 2016 holiday sales were 9.1 percent lower than in 2015. The company attributed that to lower traffic in its stores. In contrast, online sales rose 2 percent.

Other bookstore chains are struggling, and are devoting more and more floor space to things that are not books: music and movie disks, decorations, novelties, even food.

The only way for independent bookstores to survive is by specializing.

Amazon has opened some brick-and-mortar stores of its own, and while it has enabled authors to publish their own books for years, it has started a number of publishing imprints of its own, such as Thomas & Mercer (the publisher of one of BestSelling Reads’ members, Alan McDermott).

More market share will go to e-books

While paper will never go away, e-books are taking up more market share. As of 2016, the estimates in the U.S. were that print books represent 39% of book units sold, and e-books 61%.

The ease and economy of publishing e-books is one of the factors behind the staggering growth in the numbers of self-publishing authors.

More writers will self-publish

Some writers call this “increased competition,” but that term doesn’t quite capture the reality of writers. Books are not like cars or washing machines—we read them in a matter of days, usually, and move on to the next book.

Restaurant cluster in Paris

The situation is more comparable to restaurants. Restaurant owners are smart to cluster together, because more options bring more customers. Diners love to come to a street crowded with restaurants, and will come back many times to try all the choices available.

Readers are the same. After all, a traditional bookstore brings together thousands of different authors, and readers prefer bigger bookstores with more choice.

Writers will band together

Another prediction I read was that authors will work together to increase their audiences. That’s interesting, because working with other authors is how I began self-publishing fiction. I find my experience with BestSelling Reads, and another group I belong to called Independent Authors International, to be hugely rewarding—in terms finding other great writers, learning how to improve my writing, as well as finding new readers.

The big challenge for writers is not to out-compete other writers, not to sell books (although that’s a nice thing to accomplish), but to learn how to engage with audiences. That’s what a story is: a connection, an experience shared by reader and writer.

For readers

When I was young, I cannot begin to estimate the time I spent hanging around in bookstores, looking at all the titles I had to choose from. Readers today can spend hours just perusing books, trying to decide which one to open next. That’s why sites like Goodreads and Library Thing are so popular—they help readers decide which book to read next, to find good books in the e-mountains of words available.

I promised I would not make any predictions for 2017, but I will tell you about one other trend I noticed over 2016: the increasing number of services and systems for sale to help authors sell more books by learning how to tag their titles on Amazon, set up mailing lists to readers, send enquiries to book reviewers, build platforms and more. “This is the secret that bestselling authors use.”

As I said, no predictions. Just a warning: some of these services and subscriptions are very expensive, and none of them guarantees a writer will sell more books.

No predictions, but a question to the readers out there: how do you want to engage with writers? Answer in the Comments.

 

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Monday musings: Writer—a creator or a narrator?

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The Muses Melpomene (tragedy), Erato (love poetry), and Polyhymnia (sacred poetry, hymns), by Eustache Le Sueur. Source: Wikipedia

 

I’m Samreen Ahsan and I’m the author of multiple award-winning books. Many people who didn’t know me as an author, or who knew me before I started writing, have asked me what inspired me to write. Some people also ask how I develop a story in my mind; is it the start or the end I write first? When you write, is there a specific time of the day or an entire day dedicated to the writing?

Honestly speaking, there are no specific answers to these questions. For me, the rule of writing is: there is NO rule of writing. You don’t create a story—the story comes to you. It’s like a revelation. It can come to you anytime, anywhere. There are some places and events that help you strengthen your storyline but of course, there is just one thing, one tiny ball of thoughts you need to prick, and boom—the story starts to flow in your mind. The characters talk to you, haunt you in your dreams, stalk you everywhere, asking you to write and write and write. You cannot concentrate anywhere unless you listen to those characters and write whatever they want you to write.

When a reader asks me why a certain character acts in such a way, or someone leaves a review saying: it should have been this or that way—I do not have answers for those comments. The story is how my characters came to me, the way they behaved, the way they felt. I write whatever they want me to write. It does sound like a paranormal activity and I’m sure many of the authors would agree how much the characters haunt you, and keep haunting you unless you finish their story. It may sound like a curse, but I find it a blessing.

In this way, a writer is never alone. She has the characters to travel everywhere with her. There is an unseen world, parallel to our world, which we, as writers, carry in our heads silently. We see those characters talking to each other, we observe their behaviors, and narrate it.

I love to travel and I always imagine my characters while discovering the new places, always thinking what if this particular character visit this place. I try to see these places from their point of view.

My first book, A Silent Prayer is set in city of Toronto, where I live. The places mentioned in the story are based on my personal experience. The plot is based on mythical creatures, the Jinn mentioned in Holy Quran, and part of my faith is also believing in their existence. For some, it may sound like believing in vampires or dragons but this is how it is. There is no explanation when it comes to faith. You either believe it, or you don’t. Religion does not really provide you any logic.

My second story, Once Upon A [Stolen] Time is a romantic fantasy, set in both modern and medieval England. If you ask me, what was the inspiration: just like my main female character, I am also obsessed with castles and palaces. I always wanted to write a story that revolves around a haunted castle but I couldn’t prick that tiny ball of thoughts for sometime. Then out of nowhere, I had a dream and I pricked that ball, that one single thread you keep on pulling, until your story is fully developed, characters coming out of their shells.

I have written romance novels so far, but I don’t think this is the only genre I’d write in the future. It depends what kind of character comes into my mind and what kind of incident triggers the story.

There are some characters in my stories that change drastically and when I write about them, I also get surprised by how much they develop from the start to the end of the story. The entire story doesn’t come in one go. It comes in phases. Sometimes, despite what you thought at initial stages, the story takes a totally different turn when you actually write it. It’s those characters that argue with you and want their way and you have no other choice than to listen to your characters and let them lead the story.

I’m just the narrator for my characters. I help them fabricate their story, and show it to the world.

Samreen Ahsan is the author of The Prayer Series: A Silent Prayer and A Prayer Heeded, as well as a new series beginning with Once Upon A [Stolen] Time. To find out more about her and her books, visit her:

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Monday musings: Alan McDermott introduces himself

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I’m Alan, and I’m the author of seven thrillers.  The first six are part of the Tom Gray action thriller series, while the latest, Trojan, is a spinoff featuring the MI5 team led by Andrew Harvey.

Back in July 2011, my first book hit the Amazon shelves.  Gray Justice was written as a standalone, just to see if I could do it.  My ambition back then was to make a few pounds a month to top up a meagre salary, and sales were pitiful.  It was six months before I received my first royalty cheque, because in those days you had to reach £10 before they paid you!  It was during that period that someone left a review on Amazon asking what was going to happen to Tom next.  The truth was, I had no idea!  Still, I wrote Gray Resurrection, and then Gray Redemption.  The plan was to stop there, but more and more people were interested in Gray’s adventures, so I started on Gray Retribution.  By this time, the books had sold roughly 50,000 copies, and I got a call from Thomas & Mercer offering me a four-book contract.  The rest, as they say, is history.

Now, as with Gray Justice and every book since, I write by the seat of my pants.  I’ve tried plotting books out beforehand but never manage to stick to the story.  My main character has evolved immensely over time, going from a thinly-painted figure (mainly to hide his true intentions) to a fully-rounded character loved by many.  One thing that has changed is my writing style.  Back in 2011 I had no idea what POV meant, and it shows in my early work.  However, working with the editor at Thomas & Mercer on my last four books has taught me so much about the art.   Reading a lot has also helped me add more descriptive content to my work without bogging the story down.  I like my action fast-paced, and I want to give the same to my readers.

Most of my writing is done during the week at the local library using a notepad and pen.  Once I have 20 or so pages, I spend a day at home typing them up and editing as I go.  Weekends are reserved for my family.  I’m not really one for flying, so my wife and daughters take holidays abroad while I stay at home and catch up on the things I can’t do while they’re around, such as binge-watching box sets like Game of Thrones.

Read more about Alan on his BestSelling Reads author page.

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Monday Musings: A year of writing, mothering, traveling, and learning lessons

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Emily Kimelman’s year behind and the year ahead

Twenty sixteen was one heck of a year for me…and a lot of people. I spent January and February in a haze of mommy-hood, barely sleeping but doing lots of cuddling with my newborn daughter and husband—man that was cozy.

Never a family to just chillax, we traveled to Mexico and Texas escaping the freezing temperatures of New York. I also was preparing for the launch of my Sydney Rye Kindle World which went live on March 17, 2016 with the help of seven amazing authors.

It was a ton of work, super fun and totally exhilarating; I’m very proud that the world of Sydney Rye is now available for anyone to pen a story in—I know I have a ton of fun with her and Blue. My readers have really enjoyed the new novellas and so have I!

In April, my family moved onto an airstream (we seriously can not just chillax!). We headed to Cape Cod, and I started working on The Girl With The Gun, the eighth book in my Sydney Rye Series. It was the first book I dictated entirely—a practice I started toward the end of my pregnancy due to my body’s straight-up refusal to be stuck at a desk. Turns out a giant baby bump is bad for your back. Lol.

Since dictation is so much better for my body, I was determined to continue the practice, even though I no longer had the same physical restrictions. My dream of walking on the beach and speaking my stories aloud came true. I used Dragon Dictate to transcribe and it worked out great… except that I didn’t update the rest of my process to accommodate my dictation.

See, I’ve always written my first drafts straight through—don’t look back! is my motto. I fix everything in editing later. But, when I went back to look at my transcription they made no sense—here’s an example of a sentence:

It only the martyr Troy Campbell enter.

So, yeah, I had to listen to all the recording as I edited—which, um, slowed me down … a lot. So, lesson learned! Now, I always go through my transcriptions right after I speak them. I can usually remember what the heck I was trying to say and have it all make sense 🙂

I finished the first draft of The Girl with the Gun at the end of May and in June Toby Neal and I started co-authoring our Scorch Romance Thriller Series. The first book was done in thirteen days! And it sucked! Lol. Seriously though, it was terrible. We almost gave up. But instead we pushed on and now, as I write this, we’ve completed four of the books and are hard at work on the fifth and sixth with a launch schedule that starts at the end of January 2017.
We are both super excited about this series. It’s some of the best work we’ve ever done. Romance Thriller is a new genre for both of us and we’ve found a voice together that we think is pretty much impossible to put down *rubs hands together gleefully*. Seriously, if you’re a fan of the genre I dare you to start this series without finishing it. In fact, I double dog dare you.

I’m ending the year in my airstream with my husband and daughter. We were in Texas in December and reached California as 2017 dawned. I’m looking forward to a year of adventure, romance and writing.

May you all have a happy, healthy, loving holiday season and new year!

Emily Kimelman is the author of the best selling Sydney Rye Series featuring a strong female protagonist and her canine best friend, Blue. It is recommended for the 18+ who enjoy some violence, don’t mind dirty language, and are up for a dash of sex. Not to mention an awesome, rollicking good mystery!

Find out more about her on Emily’s BestSelling Reads Author page.

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Monday musings: Looking back on 2016

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Photo courtesy of Jannes Pockele (Creative Commons)

By Renée Pawlish

2016 has been a busy year for me. I started the year by publishing the first novel in the Dewey Webb historical mystery series. Dewey Webb first appeared in a Reed Ferguson mystery, Back Story, and I thought it would be fun to develop Dewey into a spin-off series. This year, I published three Dewey mysteries (Web of Deceit, Murder in Fashion, Secrets and Lies). The stories take place in the late 1940s, and it’s been fun to write the stories, but also challenging to make them as historically accurate as possible. I’ve been blessed with a few beta readers who grew up in the Denver area, and they’ve helped me with tips on Denver during that time, and they’ve also corrected some of my mistakes. When I started this series, I didn’t know if it would take off or not, but I’ve been pleasantly surprised. Readers seem to like Dewey, and I plan to write at least three or four more in the series.

I’ve also continued the Reed Ferguson mystery series, adding two more novels, two novellas, and a short story. The challenge for this series is to keep Reed fresh. I always thought I would stop this series at eight books, but I’m about to release the fifteenth book in the series. With each new novel, I try to come up with a new and interesting premise, and make sure that Reed’s supporting cast is involved in fun ways (my readers love the cast around Reed almost as much as Reed himself). I don’t plot out my stories ahead of time, and it’s refreshing to see what’s in store for all the characters.  

One of the things I challenged myself to do in 2016 was to release a novel every other month, and a short story or novella in the months between those releases. I wasn’t able to do this the entire year, but I came close. It’s not been easy, but when I’m writing a novel, I try to keep to a goal of writing one chapter per day. I don’t ever hit this, and a day here or there gets missed, but overall I am able to write a novel in about six weeks. For me, that’s about as fast as I can write a book and still feel that it’s a quality product. I’d like to keep up this schedule in 2017, but I’ll only do it if I feel like I’m still producing good stories, and if my readers say the stories are good. If not, it’s time to slow down.

Finally, I’ve had my best sales year yet, and I am very pleased with that. Amazon continues to make things challenging for authors, but I’ve still done well. I hope that this growth continues in 2017 and beyond.

Thanks for reading.

Renée Pawlish is the award-winning author of the bestselling Reed Ferguson mystery series, horror bestseller Nephilim Genesis of Evil, The Noah Winters YA Adventure series, middle-grade historical novel This War We’re In, Take Five, a short story collection, and
The Sallie House: Exposing the Beast Within, a nonfiction account of a haunted house investigation.

Visit Renée’s

And follow her on Twitter @reneepawlish.

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Monday musings: The opposite of writer’s block

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By Scott Bury

Image from Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand by Creative Commons

Recently, a number of BestSelling Reads members have written about writer’s block: a strange impediment to writing their next book, and how they got past it.

I have the opposite problem: too many books to write and not enough time to write them all down.

I get ideas for books and stories all the time, from so many different sources. Sometimes it’s a news story. There’s a recent, tragic story about a woman murdered by her husband—a scenario that plays out altogether too often. Perhaps the writer’s imagination is perverse, but the news story sparked an idea in mine.

A woman is found murdered in her home by her husband, a long-haul trucker who only gets home on average every 10 days. The investigators then find she had a second husband, whose job also keeps him away from home for extended periods. And then there’s a third husband, in a different city, with a different home.

So now I’m wondering how a person could arrange her life to make this all work, and then why?

It sounds interesting, but in the meantime, I have just sent to my editor the third volume in the trilogy about my father-in-law’s experiences in the Eastern Front of World War 2, Walking Out of War. This is a book that took me decades to write, on and off. (You can get more information about the previous two volumes here.)

I’ve committed to writing another Lei Crime Kindle World novella for a March 2017 deadline. Novellas are relatively short and somewhat less difficult to write. I already have a complete plot outlined, and but it will still be a challenge to meet that deadline.

And I want to finally write the follow-up to my first novel, The Bones of the Earth. I promised my readers that was the first novel in the Dark Age Trilogy—five years ago. I have the story arc of the second volume, The Triumph of the Sky, and a lot of the plot and main characters developed.

But wait—there will be another surge of Sydney Rye Kindle World novellas in April, and I have a great idea to bring team Sydney and Blue up with Van and LeBrun, the characters I introduced to that world in my first Sydney Rye Kindle World novella, The Wife Line.

And I have so many other stories I would like to bring to the world:

  • Dark Clouds, a novel that crosses the paranormal, occult and spy-thriller genres, which I began with a short story called “The Mandrake Ruse” and published years ago
  • the third part of the Dark Age Trilogy: The Seventh Son
  • The Last Tiger, about two boys who accompany their parents to study the disappearing Siberian tiger in the wild
  • A novel about an inventor in a small town who falls in love with a woman who shows up in his small town with no memory

So many books to write, so many tales to tell.

So little time.

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