Announcing a new #BestSelling member: J.L. Oakley

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BestSelling Reads is thrilled to announce another new member: the award-winning, bestselling author of historical fiction, J.L. Oakley.

Janet wrote her first historical fiction in the fifth grade and has not stopped since. She contributes to a number of journals and literary publications, and is the author of seven works of historical fiction:

She also published an essay about a city that lost its water supply three days before Christmas, The Christmas Well.

Janet’s writing has won a number of awards:

When she’s not writing, Janet demonstrates 19th-century folkways in schools and at San Juan Island National Park in Washington State.

“I consider myself very fortunate to have been invited to this stellar group of best selling and active writers from across the world,” she says.

Get to know more about J.L. Oakley and her books at:

And follow her on Twitter @JlOakley13.

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A look ahead: D.G. Torrens’ literary plans for 2018

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2018 is shaping up to be a busy and ambitious year for bestselling author D.G. Torrens.

Hello, readers! BestSelling Reads asked me to tell you my literary plans for the coming year.

I am currently writing a book of dark poetry that takes the readers to the far corners of the mind, titled Abyss: Thought provoking poetry & prose. Deep emotion expressed through the art of poetry. Touching on all those emotions people often hide from those around them, sadness, anxiety, depression, loss, rejection and so much more. I am very excited about this, deep thought-provoking poetry book that will be released around March 2018.

I am also 37,000 words in on my latest work-in-progress. Finding You is a romantic suspense novel, due for release around November 2018. So this is a busy year for me.

I am also looking forward to my upcoming book signing event, UK Indie Lit Fest, taking place in Bradford, UK on July 28th, 2018.

Beyond that, I have a couple of other projects (To be confirmed). I am very excited about it, but I cannot go into detail about them at this point. So watch this space—more to come!

About Dawn Torrens

D.G. Torrens is the author of 14 books, including the bestselling trilogy, Amelia’s Story #1, Amelia’s Destiny #2 and Amelia The Mother #3. This is an emotion-charged true story that the author wrote for her daughter.

D.G is a mother/writer/blogger who has a dream to inspire as many people as possible through her story. To show those with little hope that dreams can come true.

Born in England, passionate about writing, D.G. Torrens is married with a daughter. Her first book, Amelia’s Story, has inspired people all over the world. Amelia’s Destiny, book #2 is the sequel and is followed by Amelia The Mother book #3 in this awe-inspiring trilogy. A memoir that remains with D.G.’s readers long after they have put the book down …

D.G is a prolific writer and in 2013, her works were recognized by BBC Radio WM, where she has given several live interviews in the BBC studios in Birmingham, UK. Thereafter, D.G. became a regular Headline Reviewer for the radio show for the next 12 months.

Visit her on:

And follow her on Twitter @torrenstp.

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Monday musings: The writing year ahead

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At the beginning of the year, Monday Musings tells readers BestSelling authors’ plans for the year—so you can start getting excited now!

By Caleb Pirtle III

New year.

New plans.

It happens every time one yellowed and dog-eared calendar bites the dust, and another January suddenly appears out of the blue.

I have long written that today’s readers prefer shorter books.

At least they do with mystery/thrillers.

Or romance.

Forget the epics, the long-winded sagas.

Readers don’t want to make the journey anymore.

Those days of settling down and following a family through three generations and six-hundred pages have faded away.

No, readers prefer bite-sized books.

Grab me quick.

Tell me a story.

Few characters.

A lot of emotion.

Some suspense and surprises along the way.

Make me laugh a little.

Make me shed a tear or two.

Write The End, and let me move on to another book.

It may be a saga.

It may be about the same family.

But tell me their story in four books instead of one.

In today’s hectic, chaotic, stress-filed world, readers no longer have the attention span they once did.

They want short.

Maybe even shorter.

So here is what I intend to do.

During 2018, I plan to write a time travel series built around the same character.

Each book will be a novella, somewhere between 100 to 120 pages.

I will place each on Amazon as a stand-alone eBook, then my idea is to package all three novellas into one Trade paperback book.

I think the three-in-one concept will be great for book signings, which is where I sell most of paperback books anyway.

My idea is not original.

It’s not a breakthrough concept.

Many authors are already writing and producing variations of the idea.

But I’ve never done it before, so I’m anxious to give it a whirl and see what the marketplace does it with it.

The idea may work.

It may not.

It may hit a dead end and fall flat at my feet.

If so, there will always be another year.

I’ll take a deep breath and develop another plan.

Books are like life.

We have a lot of stops and starts and usually get lost a few times from the opening chapter to the last.

Caleb Pirtle III

is the author of more than seventy books, including the Ambrose Lincoln series.

Pirtle is a graduate of The University of Texas in Austin and became the first student at the university to win the National William Randolph Hearst Award for feature writing. Several of his books and his magazine writing have received national and regional awards.

Pirtle has written three teleplays, and wrote two novels for Berkeley based on the Gambler series: Dead Man’s Hand and Jokers Are Wild.

Pirtle’s narrative nonfiction, Gamble in the Devil’s Chalk is a true-life book about the fights and feuds during the founding of the controversial Giddings oilfield and From the Dark Side of the Rainbow, the story of a woman’s escape from the Nazis in Poland during World War II. His coffee-table quality book, XIT: The American Cowboy, became the publishing industry’s third best selling art book of all time.

Learn more about Caleb on his:

And follow him on Twitter @CalebPirtle.

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Bestselling writing goals for 2018: Alan McDermott

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For the beginning of 2018, BestSelling Reads members will reveal member authors’ writing plans for the year ahead—so you know the great reading you can get excited about. This week: the bestselling Alan McDermott.

Well, 2017 started off much as 2016 ended; with a work in progress that wasn’t progressing in the slightest.  I’d started my new novel in the usual way.  The seed of an idea came to me one day, and I just started writing.  After a few hundred words, I made notes for the next few chapters, but it was such a slow process.  I’ve lost count of the number of times I got stuck.  Days, even weeks would go by before I found enough inspiration to add to the manuscript, but the next block was just around the corner.

In all, it took me seventeen months to finish Driscoll: Run and Hide, and as always, it was straight onto the next idea.  Only this time, I didn’t have time to sit and write, so I just made notes over the next few days.  That turned into bullet points, then into full blown chapters ideas.  Within a week I had 35 chapters planned, and as soon as my wife set off for a two-month holiday, I began writing the second Driscoll novel.  That was the best 48 days of my writing career.  I worked twelve hours a day, every day, and finished the book before she returned.

Now, I’m back to square one.  Looking for an idea that I can turn into a three-book series.  The only problem is coming up with something original.  I thought about an MI6 agent, but that’s already been done in the form of James Bond.  An ex-soldier?  Did that with Tom Gray.  A group of high-tech vigilante do-gooders?  The PRIMAL series by Jake Silkstone has that covered.

So, my task for 2018?  Come up with something truly original that fans of the action-thriller genre can relate to.

No pressure, then…

Alan McDermott

lives in the south of England,  and is married with beautiful twin daughters. He recently gave up his job of creating critical applications for the NHS to write action thrillers full time.

His debut novel, Gray Justice, was very well received and earned him bestseller status. The next two books in the series — Gray Resurrection and Gray Redemption — were enough to attract the attention of a major publisher, and he has since added Gray RetributionGray Vengeance and Gray Salvation to the list.  Alan’s seventh title, Trojan, is a spinoff featuring MI5 agent Andrew Harvey, released in 2017.

Alan can be found:

Website and blog  |  Facebook    |   Twitter

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Bestselling writing goals for 2018: Raine Thomas

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For the beginning of 2018, BestSelling Reads members will reveal member authors’ writing plans for the year ahead—so you know the great reading you can get excited about.

The past three or four years have seen some significant changes in the indie publishing world. With the market becoming increasingly saturated with new authors every day, readers have more choices than ever. This is both exciting as a reader myself and frustrating as an author. With this in mind—as well as the fact that I work full-time—I’ve set what I hope are reasonable writing goals for 2018.

In the sense of the bigger picture, I plan to publish at least two new novels this year. I’m halfway done with Driving Tempo, the third book in my New Adult rocker romance series, House of Archer. Also on my radar is For the Win, a third New Adult baseball romance featuring some of my readers’ favorite characters from my books For Everly and Meant for Her. As long as I stay on target, I don’t foresee having any issues reaching this goal.

Another writing goal I hope to accomplish in 2018 is completing a short story to accompany the publication of my New Adult Sci-Fi romances, the Ascendant series, as a three-book set. I intend to chat with my PR company, Red Coat PR, about some ideas to help promote this release. I’m sure a book sale of some kind will be involved!

One final goal of mine relates to the marketing side of indie publishing. I intend to identify at least one new and innovative way to market my books and then pursue implementing it. There are so many resources on the internet that I have no excuses. It’s time to try and solve the mystery of the best way to reach new readers.

While none of these goals is particularly revolutionary, I’m hoping they help swing the sales pendulum on its upwards arc. The past couple years have seen a disheartening dip, but I can’t allow that to stop me from pursuing my passion and writing the stories in my soul. Here’s to a fun-filled, successful new year!

About the author

Raine-Thomas-Headshot-small-233x300Raine Thomas is the multiple award-winning author of bestselling Young Adult and New Adult fiction. Known for character-driven stories that inspire the imagination, Raine has signed with multiple award-winning producer Chase Chenowith of Back Fence Productions to bring her popular Daughters of Saraqael trilogy to the big screen. She’s a proud indie author who is living the dream. When she isn’t writing or glued to e-mail or social networking sites, Raine can usually be found vacationing with her husband and daughter on one of Florida’s beautiful beaches or crossing the border to visit with her Canadian friends and relatives.

Where to find her

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What to give the fantasy reader on your list? A BestSelling Read!

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It’s getting to crunch time in the gift-buying season. What can you get the fantasy reader on your shopping list? A BestSelling Read, of course. And this it the perfect place to find great fantasy reads.

Samreen Ahsan

Samreen Ahsan’s award-winning A Prayer series is a romantic fantasy based on Islamic themes. Her new series, starting with Once Upon a [Stolen] Time, combines fantasy, science-fiction and time travel in a powerful love story that spans centuries.

Frederick Lee Brooke

The Drone Wars trilogy is a fast-paced, thrilling and chilling science-fiction series that peeks a few very short years into the future civil war that tears the United States apart.

 

Scott Bury

The Bones of the Earth breaks the mould of fantasy. Set in the real sixth-century Byzantine Empire, it tells the story of a young Sklavene named Javor who needs to find out how a dagger and amulet he inherited from his great-grandfather is connected to deep forces bent on erasing humanity from the face of the earth.

DelSheree Gladden

The Something Wicked This Way Comes series tells the story of young godlings finding their way in a world that doesn’t believe in them—and facing forces that want to destroy them,.

Her Twin Souls trilogy evokes Native American mythology in a reader-favorite series.

In the Aerling series, beings who are not ghosts depend on Olivia to guide them to their destiny.

DelSheree goes to the world of actual ghosts in her Ghost Host series, where poor Echo Simmons needs to learn what to do with the ghosts that haunt her YouTube channel.

Her Destroyer series tells the story of Libby, who’s person capable of destroying the world—so it’s no big surprise when she ends up with a Guardian blade at her throat.

Toby Neal

On the island of Lanai, teens from very different worlds must find a way to survive when all technology is destroyed, aided by a mysterious `aumakua dragon that may or may not be imaginary.

 

Raine Thomas

Raine Thomas

Raine Thomas has crafted several fantasy series. Each book in the Daughters of Saraquel series focuses on one sister who has to learn what it means to Become, and how to live on the Estilorian Plane.

The Firstborn trilogy traces the story of the descendants of Saraqael as they embark upon their own thrilling adventures and race against time to save the Estilorian plane…battling for love along the way

The Ascendant series are New Adult novels intended for audiences over 17 years. It tells how secret lovers Kyr and Ty must save the planet of Alametria, even while its inhabitants are trying to kill them.

Subscribe to get this blog by email to keep on top of all the best new fantasies, mysteries, romances and thrillers that the avid readers on your gift-giving list will love.

 

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Monday musings: On Cyber Monday, books and writing

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It’s Cyber Monday, the day when we’re all supposed to head to the online shops and buy electronics. Now, don’t worry—I’m not here to complain about the over-commercializations of the holiday. Not this time, anyway.

But this day every year is a good place to mark the evolution of our market economy. To observe just how much has changed in our shopping and buying habits.

It seems that the growth of digital e-books at the expense of paper has slowed. Maybe we’re reaching some kind of equilibrium.  We’ve learned the relative strengths and weaknesses of each, and are allowing both formats their space.

It also seems fitting that on Cyber Monday, two major Canadian newspaper chains are closing dozens of community newspaper. The owners say that in many communities, declining advertising revenue means the community newspaper business model is no longer viable.

Why not? The easy.analysis is to blame the eruption of online news and entertainment.

It’s an easy analysis, but it’s simplistic.

As many sides as a diamond

There are many sides to this shift. The newspaper industry has been decimated by the public shift online. Hundreds, if not thousands of journalists have lost what on time seemed a great career. Not to mention all the thousands of other Jo’s at a newspaper.

On another side, some journalists have made the shift online, themselves.And for readers, there is a vast  range of choice in new online sources for news and entertainment, and it”s so easy to find the information you want.

On a third side, there’s also a proliferation of “fake news” sources. I don’t know whether the proportion of deliberately false information online is greater than it ever was for print, but there sure is a lot of it, and people sure pay attention.

And on yet another side, there is the tracking by tech and social media companies of everything that we look at, read or buy.

Somebody’s making money. Who do you think it is?

Community newspapers are closing because there just is not enough money in the business. I know from personal experience how much cheaper online advertising is than for print—partly because of lower production costs, but mostly because of the different, per-click model, but mostly because when online advertising began,  no one knew what they were doing.

But someone is making money online. I’ll let you work that out for yourself.

Trying to stay optimistic

For avid book readers, this is a great day. So many of the authors I know are doing some kind of Black Friday or Cyber Monday launches, promotions,sales and announcements. And most e-book prices are a fraction of the cost of paper books.

Yes, there are a lot of really bad books out there. Because it’s so much easier and cheaper to produce an e-book, it’s also easier to find not only bad writing, but books produced by those who obviously have no clue to to format a book, or what punctuation is for. You can usually tell these by the amateurish covers, but not always.

Still, readers have a lot more choice. Which means it’s up to you to make good choices.

Good luck, and happy holidays.

 

 

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Monday musings: How many #books do you read at one time? #amreading

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By Gae-Lynn Woods

Do you read more than one book at a time? In addition to the time I spend writing, the time I spend reading is some of the most satisfying in my day. And I have a confession: I’ve become a polygamist when it comes to reading. I read multiple books with abandon, and for the most part, keep the characters and plots straight in my head.

I haven’t always been promiscuous when it comes to books. When I was a kid in Englewood, Ohio and had the utter joy of stocking up on books at the library on Saturday, I’d read (eat) them one at a time, back to back, almost without drawing breath. If I finished my stack of library books before Saturday rolled around again, I’d start over with the first book and continue on in linear fashion. But with the advent of e-readers and the portability of audio books, I had no problem giving up monogamous reading. At the moment, there are five books in the rotation, as follows:

  • On the Kindle: THE BLACK WIDOW by Daniel Silva (not the most action-oriented novel he’s written, but interesting and timely)
  • On my Overdrive audio book app: BIG MAGIC: CREATIVE LIVING BEYOND FEAR by Elizabeth Gilbert (an excellent listen for anyone who lives or is considering living a creative life of any sort)
  • On my nightstand in paperback: CRIMINAL by Karin Slaughter (I’m barely into this one, but I love Karin Slaughter and expect great things)
    I’m using the Bible In One Year app, and I’ll probably stretch that year into two years, maybe a little more, before I can claim having read the Bible from cover to cover (try as I might, I can’t get into a regular enough routine to guarantee solid progress on this one – thankfully, the app didn’t force me to start over when we rolled into the new year)
  • Also active on the Kindle: A YEAR TO CLEAR: A DAILY GUIDE TO CREATING SPACIOUSNESS IN YOUR HOME AND HEART by Stephanie Bennett Vogt (this also will take more than a year to finish, but I think whatever time I give this book will be worthwhile).

Although I love all forms of reading, they don’t all get equal attention. Given that we live on a farm and spend a good deal of time outside, my Overdrive app gets lots of use. The second most used is probably the paperback on the nightstand because I can work in a few minutes of reading before turning out the light. Last is the Kindle, but one of the things I love most about it is that it’s with me as long as my phone is with me, which is most of the time.

I’m curious to know if others are of the same promiscuous bent and honestly, I’d like to know if there are other ways I can work an additional book into my reading time.

So back to the original question: how many books do you read at one time? Is there one form of reading you prefer over others?

Get to know Gae-Lynn Woods

Gae-Lynn Woods is a Texan who has traveled the world, lived overseas, and come back home. She and her husband, British jazz guitarist Martyn Popey, share a ranch in East Texas with a herd of Black Angus cattle, one very cranky donkey, and The Dude, a rescue kitty with attitude.

When she’s not playing the roadie, tending to cows, fixing fence, or digging post holes, Gae-Lynn is working on the next Cass Elliot novel and the next Companion Novel featuring Maxine Leverman, Cass’ best friend.

Gae-Lynn can be found:

Facebook   |   Twitter   |   Google+   |   Goodreads   |   LinkedIn   |    Website   |    Blog

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Monday musings: Indie Writer Life…the Struggle is Real(ly Worth It)

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By Raine Thomas

Pinterest

I was reflecting on my writing journey the other day as I prepared for my BookBub ad promoting the sale of my New Adult romance, Meant for Her. Since I first released Meant for Her, the writing industry has changed in some dramatic ways…ways that changed the lives of many indie authors. My internal reflection was on whether those changes were for the better.

I published my first three books in July of 2011. At that time, the decision about whether to go indie or traditional was a hot button among writers everywhere. Then some pioneering indie authors proved themselves by making bestseller lists and gaining avid followings, earning them publishing deals from major houses. A number of traditionally published authors have since published books independently, many with great success. The hard line between indies and traditionals back in 2011 has definitely blurred.

This has opened the door to many more authors who have dreamed of being published and who are now following in the footsteps of the indie authors before them, uploading their work onto retail sites that are now inundated with available books. On the plus side, readers now have more choices than ever. As a reader myself, I rejoice over this! As an author, however, I spend part of every day wondering how I’m going to get my books seen among the masses. It’s a challenge that many of us are facing.

That’s hardly the only challenge about being an indie author today. Not so long ago, I was making enough income from my books that I gave serious thought to writing full time. Now, I consider it lucky if my royalties cover the cost of what it takes to publish my books. All of my author friends who actually did quit their jobs to write have had to go back to work, so I’m not alone in my struggles.

More difficult to face, though, is the reduction in reader engagement. When I first published the Daughters of Saraqael trilogy, I received regular e-mails and social media messages from readers telling me how much they enjoyed the books or asking when my next book would be released. That interest kept me motivated and encouraged me to write seven books in that series when I only intended to write three. Any writer will tell you that fan feedback is the number one thing that keeps us writing. Once that interest fades, our passion can fade along with it.

It occurred to me in my musings last week that I’m rarely contacted by fans these days. The thought was deflating, making me question why I continued to try and breathe life into a fading writing career. Then just this morning I received an e-mail asking when my next book was going to be released, as the fan couldn’t wait to read it.

It was like a sign from the universe, and it inspired me to write this post. Whether or not they’re for the better, there have been notable changes in the publishing industry over the past few years. We indie authors shouldn’t allow those changes to impact the writers we are today. Instead, we need to focus on the future, on honing our craft and figuring out how to adapt to today’s reader culture.

Looking back on the publishing path that brought me to where I am now is helpful in that it laid the foundation for my writing career. Now I need to move forward and work on overcoming the struggles faced by today’s indie authors. I hope all of the other indies out there remember the passion that got them started. We need to remind ourselves that we’re doing something we love…and that makes it all worth it.

About Raine

Raine Thomas is the award-winning author of bestselling Young Adult and New Adult fiction. Known for character-driven stories that inspire the imagination, Raine has signed with multiple award-winning producer Chase Chenowith of Back Fence Productions to bring her popular Daughters of Saraqael trilogy to the big screen. She’s a proud indie author who is living the dream.

When she isn’t writing or glued to e-mail or social networking sites, Raine can usually be found vacationing with her husband and daughter on one of Florida’s beautiful beaches or crossing the border to visit with her Canadian friends and relatives.

Where to find her

BestSelling Reads author page  |  Amazon Author page  |  Website  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  Pinterest  |  Tumblr  |  Instagram  |  YouTube  |  Goodreads  |Linkedin  |  Tsu

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Monday musings: Is it 1984 all over again?

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By Caleb Pirtle III

This post originally appeared on Caleb Pirtle III’s and Linda Pirtle’s blog, Here Comes a Mystery, on September 13, 2017.

George Orwell with the cover image of the book 1984

George Orwell with the cover image of the book that made him memorable and famous.

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.

So the government is spying on you. I read that somewhere.

So the government is stealing your emails. Read that, too.

So the government is keeping tabs on your phone calls. It’s in the news.

Sounds Osrwellian. That’s what the news reporters say.

Big Brother is watching.

Maybe George Orwell was right, they whisper.

1984 tops bestseller lists in January, 2017. LA Times.

Did anyone ever have any doubts? Maybe this is 1984.  Maybe it just came three decades later than anyone expected.

Readers of great literature, teachers of great literature, and critics of great literature have believed for years that George Orwell, back during the 1940s, glimpsed the future, discovered a dystopian world, realized that Totalitarianism was the most foreboding consequence facing humanity, and spread his fears on a piece of paper.

He described his work as “a Utopia written in the form of a novel.” It would be one of the most significant books produced in the twentieth century. It would be translated into sixty-five languages. It would sell millions of copies.

It was the book that killed George Orwell.

Orwell was obsessed with the conspiracy of a totalitarian government rising up from the ashes of World War II to rule England, rule the world, rule his life. Part of the inspiration for 1984, he once said, came from a meeting that Allied leaders had in Tehran in 1944.

There was Stalin.

And Churchill.

And Roosevelt.

He feared they were consciously plotting to divide the world, then fight to determine who would control it all.

George Orwell was a sad little man. But he was a brilliant writer.

He lived in a bleak world. He had endured the bombing of London. He had survived a world war. A troubled ife in the wartime ruins of the city created a constant mood of random terror and a constant fear that the next bomb would be looking for him.

Bomb damage in North London, June 1944; AIR 14/3701 National Archive

His flat had been wrecked. His was a threadbare existence. He had a wife and a child. His wife died under anesthesia during a routine operation while Orwell was on assignment with a magazine. Her death haunted him and grieved him, and he would never quite recover.

Most of all, Orwell was afraid of the future that his imagination envisioned. He heard the demons in his head. His health was bad. The winter of 1946-47, was one of the coldest ever, and he found that post-war Britain to be even darker, more dreadful, and more foreboding than wartime Britain.  He grew even more morose, a man who, his agent said, thrived on self-inflicted adversity.

George Orwell retired to a wild and isolated landscape in Scotland to begin writing a novel that had tempted and taunted him for years. As he once pointed out, “Every serious work I have written since the Spanish Civil War in 1936 was written directly or indirectly against totalitarianism and democratic socialism.

Now his story would be told on a grand scale.

He hated the process.

Orwell wrote: “Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven by some demon whom he can neither resist or understand. For all one knows, that demon is the same instinct that makes a baby squall for attention. And yet it is also true that one can write nothing readable unless one constantly struggles to efface one’s personality.”

Then he wrote the words that became known as the famous Orwellian coda: “Good prose is like a window pane.”

He sat down and wrote the first line of the novel: It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.

Through the window pain, he could see the bleak landscape of 1984.

His world in Scotland was simple. And primitive. Cold. In the midst of a bitter winter, he had no electricity, and Orwell lived by chain-smoking black shag tobacco in roll-up cigarettes.

He coughed all the time.

He was spitting blood.

He looked cadaverous.

Just before Christmas of 1947, Orwell collapsed with “inflammation of the lungs.” The diagnosis frightened him even more. He was suffering from tuberculosis, and there was no cure for TB. But he couldn’t stop. He couldn’t recuperate. He had a novel to finish.

As he wrote his publisher: “I have got so used to writing in bed that I think I prefer it, though, of course, it’s awkward to type there. I am just struggling with the last stages of this bloody book about the possible state of affairs if the atomic war isn’t conclusive.”

The struggle ended in December of 1948 with the publication of 1984. He thought about calling the novel The Last Man in Europe. His publisher decided on 1984.  He thought it was more commercial, and he was right. He called it “among the most terrifying books I have read.” He was right again.

By January of 1950, George Orwell was dead.

The ordeal had taken its toll.

Orwell would never have to face the world he was afraid to face. He gave his life for a book that gave the world such ominous words as Big Brother, thoughtcrime, newspeak, and doublethink.

And now, as Orwell had predicted and maybe even envisioned, we live in an uncomfortable world filled with conspiracy rumors about Big Brother, thoughtcrimes, newspeak, and doublethink.

It may be new to us, but we all remember who created the world long before, some say, it came to exist.  Within twenty-four hours after the story broke on the alleged NSA’s spying scandal, the sales for George Orwell’s 1984 had surged seven thousand percent.

About the author

Caleb Pirtle III is the author of more than seventy books, including the Ambrose Lincoln series: Secrets of the DeadConspiracy of LiesNight Side of Dark and Place of Skulls.

Pirtle is a graduate of The University of Texas in Austin and became the first student at the university to win the National William Randolph Hearst Award for feature writing. Several of his books and his magazine writing have received national and regional awards.

 

Pirtle was a newspaper reporter for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and served ten years as travel editor for Southern Living Magazine. He was editorial director for a Dallas custom publisher for more than twenty-five years.

Get to know Caleb at his:

And follow him on Twitter @CalebPirtle.

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